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Sweden:Organisation of Programmes for Pre-Primary Education

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Overview Sweden

Contents

Sweden:Political, Social and Economic Background and Trends

Sweden:Historical Development

Sweden:Main Executive and Legislative Bodies

Sweden:Population: Demographic Situation, Languages and Religions

Sweden:Political and Economic Situation

Sweden:Organisation and Governance

Sweden:Fundamental Principles and National Policies

Sweden:Lifelong Learning Strategy

Sweden:Organisation of the Education System and of its Structure

Sweden:Organisation of Private Education

Sweden:National Qualifications Framework

Sweden:Administration and Governance at Central and/or Regional Level

Sweden:Administration and Governance at Local and/or Institutional Level

Sweden:Statistics on Organisation and Governance

Sweden:Funding in Education

Sweden:Early Childhood and School Education Funding

Sweden:Higher Education Funding

Sweden:Adult Education and Training Funding

Sweden:Early Childhood Education and Care

Sweden:Organisation of Programmes for Pre-Primary Education

Sweden:Teaching and Learning in Programmes for Pre-Primary Education

Sweden:Assessment in Programmes for Pre-Primary Education

Sweden:Organisation of the Pre-Primary Class

Sweden:Teaching and Learning in the Pre-Primary Class

Sweden:Assessment in the Pre-Primary Class

Sweden:Organisational Variations and Alternative Structures in Early Childhood Education and Care

Sweden:Single Structure Education (Integrated Primary and Lower Secondary Education)

Sweden:Organisation of Single Structure Education

Sweden:Teaching and Learning in Single Structure Education

Sweden:Assessment in Single Structure Education

Sweden:Organisational Variations and Alternative Structures in Single Structure Education

Sweden:Upper Secondary and Post-Secondary Non-Tertiary Education

Sweden:Organisation of Upper General and Vocational Secondary Education

Sweden:Teaching and Learning in Upper General and Vocational Secondary Education

Sweden:Assessment in Upper General and Vocational Secondary Education

Sweden:Organisation of Post-Secondary Non-Tertiary Education

Sweden:Teaching and Learning in Post-Secondary Non-Tertiary Education

Sweden:Assessment in Post-Secondary Non-Tertiary Education

Sweden:Higher Education

Sweden:Types of Higher Education Institutions

Sweden:First Cycle Programmes

Sweden:Bachelor

Sweden:Short-Cycle Higher Education

Sweden:Second Cycle Programmes

Sweden:Programmes outside the Bachelor and Master Structure

Sweden:Third Cycle (PhD) Programmes

Sweden:Adult Education and Training

Sweden:Distribution of Responsibilities

Sweden:Developments and Current Policy Priorities

Sweden:Main Providers

Sweden:Main Types of Provision

Sweden:Validation of Non-formal and Informal Learning

Sweden:Teachers and Education Staff

Sweden:Initial Education for Teachers Working in Early Childhood and School Education

Sweden:Conditions of Service for Teachers Working in Early Childhood and School Education

Sweden:Continuing Professional Development for Teachers Working in Early Childhood and School Education

Sweden:Initial Education for Academic Staff in Higher Education

Sweden:Conditions of Service for Academic Staff Working in Higher Education

Sweden:Continuing Professional Development for Academic Staff Working in Higher Education

Sweden:Initial Education for Teachers and Trainers Working in Adult Education and Training

Sweden:Conditions of Service for Teachers and Trainers Working in Adult Education and Training

Sweden:Continuing Professional Development for Teachers and Trainers Working in Adult Education and Training

Sweden:Management and Other Education Staff

Sweden:Management Staff for Early Childhood and School Education

Sweden:Staff Involved in Monitoring Educational Quality for Early Childhood and School Education

Sweden:Education Staff Responsible for Guidance in Early Childhood and School Education

Sweden:Other Education Staff or Staff Working with Schools

Sweden:Management Staff for Higher Education

Sweden:Other Education Staff or Staff Working in Higher Education

Sweden:Management Staff Working in Adult Education and Training

Sweden:Other Education Staff or Staff Working in Adult Education and Training

Sweden:Quality Assurance

Sweden:Quality Assurance in Early Childhood and School Education

Sweden:Quality Assurance in Higher Education

Sweden:Quality Assurance in Adult Education and Training

Sweden:Educational Support and Guidance

Sweden:Special Education Needs Provision within Mainstream Education

Sweden:Separate Special Education Needs Provision in Early Childhood and School Education

Sweden:Support Measures for Learners in Early Childhood and School Education

Sweden:Guidance and Counselling in Early Childhood and School Education

Sweden:Support Measures for Learners in Higher Education

Sweden:Guidance and Counselling in Higher Education

Sweden:Support Measures for Learners in Adult Education and Training

Sweden:Guidance and Counselling in a Lifelong Learning Approach

Sweden:Mobility and Internationalisation

Sweden:Mobility in Early Childhood and School Education

Sweden:Mobility in Higher Education

Sweden:Mobility in Adult Education and Training

Sweden:Other Dimensions of Internationalisation in Early Childhood and School Education

Sweden:Other Dimensions of Internationalisation in Higher Education

Sweden:Other Dimensions of Internationalisation in Adult Education and Training

Sweden:Bilateral Agreements and Worldwide Cooperation

Sweden:Ongoing Reforms and Policy Developments

Sweden:National Reforms in Early Childhood Education and Care

Sweden:National Reforms in School Education

Sweden:National Reforms in Vocational Education and Training and Adult Learning

Sweden:National Reforms in Higher Education

Sweden:National Reforms related to Transversal Skills and Employability

Sweden:European Perspective

Sweden:Legislation

Sweden:Institutions

Sweden:Glossary

Accessibility

Irrespective of where they live, all children must have equal access to the public education system, including preschool. Each type of school must offer equivalent education irrespective of where it is provided. The municipality is responsible for offering a place in a preschool as close to the child's home as possible. Reasonable regard shall also be paid to guardian's wishes. The municipalities are not legally obligated to provide transportation to the preschool.

There is a "principle of proximity" (närhetsprincip), which means that the child should be offered a place at a preschool as close to the home as possible. If a child lives closer to a preschool in another municipality it is possible for the child to access that preschool, especially if the child's particular needs would be better fulfilled in that preschool. Such needs could be access to a preschool in the child's native language if it is an official Swedish minority language, if the child has special educational needs that cannot be met at the preschool in the municipality of residence or if the child's parents live in different municipalities. Municipalities in rural areas often make arrangements so that children can attend the nearest preschool, regardless of municipality. In those cases the municipality of residence compensates the municipality where the child attends preschool.

Admission Requirements and Choice of ECEC Institution

Under the Education Act the municipalities are required to provide preschool activities and childcare for children aged 1–12 years to the extent necessary for their parents to be able to work or study or for the child’s own needs. This requirement also includes preschool for children whose parents are unemployed or on parental leave with another sibling. These children should be offered a place in preschool or pedagogical care for at least three hours per day or 15 hours per week. All children are entitled to free preschool for at least 525 hours per year from the autumn term when they turn three years old. The municipality shall take reasonable account of the wishes of the parent or guardian as regards provision of childcare, both concerning the type of care and the choice of organiser.

A total of 83 percent of all children aged 1–5 years old attend preschool. The distribution between boys and girls is generally equal. The proportion of enrolled children has increased to some extent in all age groups. 48 percent of 1 year olds attended preschool, 88 and 92 percent respectively of 2 and 3 year olds and 93 percent of all 4 and 5 year olds (data from 2014).

School-age childcare cater for children from the year they start the preschool class or compulsory school up to and including the age of 12.

Parents have the right to appeal against decisions taken by the municipality in regards to childcare and the municipality is obliged to inform the parents of how to do so. The case would go to one of Sweden's 12 administrative courts.

It is possible for preschools to exclude children when the parents have failed to pay the fee. However, fees are calculated according to income with low-income families paying nothing while the costs is capped at SEK 1,287 (about €140) per month for all families.

Age Levels and Grouping of Children

A preschool normally consists of two to five groups according to the age of the children. The number of children per group varies. Mixed age groups are most common; there are groups for children up to the age of three and groups for three- to five-year-olds. Some preschools have so called ‘sibling groups’ for one- to five-year-olds. In some preschools there are also groups for children of the same age.

Leisure time centres (fritidshem) provide activities outside school hours for pupils of different ages, from the preschool class up to the age of 12. Open leisure time centres often provide activities for pupils between the ages of 10 to 12.

There is no national regulation determining the number of children per employee or the number of children in a group. However, the Swedish National Agency for Education (Skolverket) has drawn up general guidelines regarding quality in preschools and leisure time centres, which includes the appropriate composition and size of groups of children. The guiding principle used in grouping children is the child's need for continuity and consistency in their daily activities. The aim is to satisfy the child's needs to be together with others, to play and work with their peers as well as with older and younger friends, regardless what form of grouping is used. In order to develop a sense of group identity, great emphasis is placed on establishing continuity in both the children's groups and amongst the staff.

In the autumn 2014, the average number of children per group in preschools was 16.9. The groups with 15 or fewer children accounted for 23 percent of all groups. In 14 percent of the groups there were 22 or more children. In the autumn 2014 there were 5.3 children per full-time employee in preschool. There were very large variations between the municipalities.

Organisation of Time

Preschools and childcare for school-age children are open throughout the year subject to need. School-age childcare caters for children during the part of the day when they are not in school and during holidays. Preschools have the opening hours determined by the municipality, both regarding the year and the day. A municipality might for example state that the preschools should be open all weekdays except bank holidays between 6.30 in the morning and 6.30 p.m.

Organisation of the Day and Week

There is no syllabus for preschool, and neither is there any regulation as to how time should be allocated to various activities. The distribution of the daily workload is decided in each preschool.

An agreement is made between parents and the municipality that the municipality shall be responsible for the care of children during a given part of the day. The municipality documents this agreement. Preschools are usually open between 6.30 a.m. and 6.30 p.m. Monday to Friday.

School-age childcare (skolbarnsomsorg) caters for children during the part of the day when they are not at school and during holidays. Usually leisure-time centres are open 7.30 – 17.30 Monday to Friday. During school hours the leisure time centre staff often work in the classroom.