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Sweden:Main Types of Provision

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Overview Sweden

Contents

Sweden:Political, Social and Economic Background and Trends

Sweden:Historical Development

Sweden:Main Executive and Legislative Bodies

Sweden:Population: Demographic Situation, Languages and Religions

Sweden:Political and Economic Situation

Sweden:Organisation and Governance

Sweden:Fundamental Principles and National Policies

Sweden:Lifelong Learning Strategy

Sweden:Organisation of the Education System and of its Structure

Sweden:Organisation of Private Education

Sweden:National Qualifications Framework

Sweden:Administration and Governance at Central and/or Regional Level

Sweden:Administration and Governance at Local and/or Institutional Level

Sweden:Statistics on Organisation and Governance

Sweden:Funding in Education

Sweden:Early Childhood and School Education Funding

Sweden:Higher Education Funding

Sweden:Adult Education and Training Funding

Sweden:Early Childhood Education and Care

Sweden:Organisation of Programmes for Pre-Primary Education

Sweden:Teaching and Learning in Programmes for Pre-Primary Education

Sweden:Assessment in Programmes for Pre-Primary Education

Sweden:Organisation of the Pre-Primary Class

Sweden:Teaching and Learning in the Pre-Primary Class

Sweden:Assessment in the Pre-Primary Class

Sweden:Organisational Variations and Alternative Structures in Early Childhood Education and Care

Sweden:Single Structure Education (Integrated Primary and Lower Secondary Education)

Sweden:Organisation of Single Structure Education

Sweden:Teaching and Learning in Single Structure Education

Sweden:Assessment in Single Structure Education

Sweden:Organisational Variations and Alternative Structures in Single Structure Education

Sweden:Upper Secondary and Post-Secondary Non-Tertiary Education

Sweden:Organisation of Upper General and Vocational Secondary Education

Sweden:Teaching and Learning in Upper General and Vocational Secondary Education

Sweden:Assessment in Upper General and Vocational Secondary Education

Sweden:Organisation of Post-Secondary Non-Tertiary Education

Sweden:Teaching and Learning in Post-Secondary Non-Tertiary Education

Sweden:Assessment in Post-Secondary Non-Tertiary Education

Sweden:Higher Education

Sweden:Types of Higher Education Institutions

Sweden:First Cycle Programmes

Sweden:Bachelor

Sweden:Short-Cycle Higher Education

Sweden:Second Cycle Programmes

Sweden:Programmes outside the Bachelor and Master Structure

Sweden:Third Cycle (PhD) Programmes

Sweden:Adult Education and Training

Sweden:Distribution of Responsibilities

Sweden:Developments and Current Policy Priorities

Sweden:Main Providers

Sweden:Main Types of Provision

Sweden:Validation of Non-formal and Informal Learning

Sweden:Teachers and Education Staff

Sweden:Initial Education for Teachers Working in Early Childhood and School Education

Sweden:Conditions of Service for Teachers Working in Early Childhood and School Education

Sweden:Continuing Professional Development for Teachers Working in Early Childhood and School Education

Sweden:Initial Education for Academic Staff in Higher Education

Sweden:Conditions of Service for Academic Staff Working in Higher Education

Sweden:Continuing Professional Development for Academic Staff Working in Higher Education

Sweden:Initial Education for Teachers and Trainers Working in Adult Education and Training

Sweden:Conditions of Service for Teachers and Trainers Working in Adult Education and Training

Sweden:Continuing Professional Development for Teachers and Trainers Working in Adult Education and Training

Sweden:Management and Other Education Staff

Sweden:Management Staff for Early Childhood and School Education

Sweden:Staff Involved in Monitoring Educational Quality for Early Childhood and School Education

Sweden:Education Staff Responsible for Guidance in Early Childhood and School Education

Sweden:Other Education Staff or Staff Working with Schools

Sweden:Management Staff for Higher Education

Sweden:Other Education Staff or Staff Working in Higher Education

Sweden:Management Staff Working in Adult Education and Training

Sweden:Other Education Staff or Staff Working in Adult Education and Training

Sweden:Quality Assurance

Sweden:Quality Assurance in Early Childhood and School Education

Sweden:Quality Assurance in Higher Education

Sweden:Quality Assurance in Adult Education and Training

Sweden:Educational Support and Guidance

Sweden:Special Education Needs Provision within Mainstream Education

Sweden:Separate Special Education Needs Provision in Early Childhood and School Education

Sweden:Support Measures for Learners in Early Childhood and School Education

Sweden:Guidance and Counselling in Early Childhood and School Education

Sweden:Support Measures for Learners in Higher Education

Sweden:Guidance and Counselling in Higher Education

Sweden:Support Measures for Learners in Adult Education and Training

Sweden:Guidance and Counselling in a Lifelong Learning Approach

Sweden:Mobility and Internationalisation

Sweden:Mobility in Early Childhood and School Education

Sweden:Mobility in Higher Education

Sweden:Mobility in Adult Education and Training

Sweden:Other Dimensions of Internationalisation in Early Childhood and School Education

Sweden:Other Dimensions of Internationalisation in Higher Education

Sweden:Other Dimensions of Internationalisation in Adult Education and Training

Sweden:Bilateral Agreements and Worldwide Cooperation

Sweden:Ongoing Reforms and Policy Developments

Sweden:National Reforms in Early Childhood Education and Care

Sweden:National Reforms in School Education

Sweden:National Reforms in Vocational Education and Training and Adult Learning

Sweden:National Reforms in Higher Education

Sweden:National Reforms related to Transversal Skills and Employability

Sweden:European Perspective

Sweden:Legislation

Sweden:Institutions

Sweden:Glossary

Introduction

There are many options for adults who wish to take part in education and training in Sweden, either formal or informal. The country has the highest proportion of adults participating in education and training in Europe according to the 2015 European Commission Eurydice Report Adult Education and Training in Europe: Widening Access to Learning Opportunities

Provision to Raise Achievement in Basic Skills 

Municipal adult education

In July 2012, the new Education Act and the Ordinance on Adult Education became applicable for municipal adult education (Kommunal vuxenutbildning, Komvux), municipal adult education for adults with intellectual impairments (särvux) and Swedish tuition for immigrants (SFI), as well as for certain equivalent educational courses. At the same time, a new curriculum for adult education and training became applicable for Komvux, Särvux, SFI and equivalent educational courses. 

The curriculum for adult education (Läroplan för vuxenutbildningen 2012) under municipal responsibility is laid down by the government and sets out the overall goals and general principles of adult education. According to the curriculum, adult education should:
  • Bridge education gaps and work for increased equality and social justice.
  • Enhance students' ability to comprehend, critically examine and take part in cultural, social and political life.
  • Educate adults for a range of work tasks.
  • Contribute to modernisation of working life and the achievement of full employment.
  • Satisfy the individual desires of adults for broader study and education opportunities and give adults the opportunity to supplement upper secondary education.
The state education system for adults must be in line with fundamental democratic values. Everyone working within the adult education system should promote respect for each individual’s value as well as for the environment. In particular, steps should be taken to promote gender equality and prevent any attempt by pupils to subject others to abusive treatment including bullying and racism.

The goals of municipal adult education are to support and encourage adults in their learning. Adults should be given the opportunity to develop their knowledge and competence in order to strengthen their position in working and societal life and also to promote their personal development. The objectives in the national subject syllabi are the same for adult education at upper secondary level as they are for standard upper secondary schools. The content may, however, take different forms. For example, unlike standard upper secondary school educational provision, municipal adult education has no set programme of study for learners. Instead, the courses taken are determined by each individual's goals.

Municipal adult education has two levels, compulsory school level and upper secondary level, which correspond to the standard compulsory school and upper secondary school provision. The starting point is determined by the needs and conditions of each individual learner. Those who have received the least education should be given priority. Information about the goals for adult education is given in the subsections that follow.

Basic adult education (compulsory school level)
The syllabi laid down by the Swedish National Agency for Education sets out the detailed goals for basic adult education (grundläggande vuxenutbildning). Courses are offered in the following subjects: Swedish/Swedish as a second language, English, mathematics, social studies, religious studies, history, geography, physics, chemistry, biology and home economics and nutrition. The syllabi are the same as for compulsory schools, but the courses may be split into several sub-courses. The curriculum for basic adult education set out within the 2012 Curriculum for Ault Education (Läroplan för vuxenutbildningen 2012).

Upper secondary adult education
Upper secondary adult education (gymnasial vuxenutbildning) offers all subjects available at standard upper secondary schools except for sports and chess. The project work (projektarbete), which is mandatory for completion of upper secondary school, is not needed for completion of upper secondary adult education. The compulsory subjects, in which a grade is required for a certificate of the completion of upper secondary school, are Swedish/Swedish as a second language, English, social studies, religious studies, mathematics and natural science. While both the syllabi and learning goals are the same for adult upper secondary education and standard upper secondary school, the course contents, scope and emphases can differ. A work plan defines the measures for achieving the goals of each course and is put together by teachers, student representatives and other school staff. The school head has the final say over work plans. The curriculum for upper secondary adult education is set out within the 2012 Curriculum for Adult Education (Läroplan för vuxenutbildningen).

Admission requirements
The municipality is obliged to offer basic adult education corresponding to the compulsory school (grundskolan) (up to ninth grade) for everybody over 20 who does not have the proficiency normally gained at the compulsory school level.

For upper secondary adult education, municipalities must strive to offer courses that meet local demands and needs. If the number of places is fewer than the number of eligible applicants for a course, priority must be given to those who lack the knowledge taught in the course and who have the least previous educational attainment. According to the particular criteria for eligibility, applicants should 1) have limited education; 2) be in need of the course for a planned or current occupation, to supplement an incomplete programme from the upper secondary school (gymnasieskolan) or to supplement their qualifications; and 3) be able to complete the studies in accordance with the agreed study plan.

Organisation and assessment
Municipal adult education is to be based on the needs and requirements of the individual. Support for adult learning may take the form of teaching, supervision, study guidance and assessments of goal attainment and knowledge, skills and competence gained. Each student is also to receive an individual study plan based on his or her abilities and current life circumstances.

Both basic and upper secondary adult education are largely organised in terms of courses. This means that each subject is divided into one or more courses. In principle, all national courses within the standard upper secondary school are provided to the adult learners. In addition, municipalities may arrange for courses to satisfy local needs. Each course can be studied separately and a certificate obtained on completion. Duration of a course can vary for different participants. A course may either be for a short period or spread out over a longer period. Courses can be provided during the day, evenings, weekends and over the summer. Different types of courses can be combined into an individual study programme which is unique for each student, and courses from basic (compulsory) and upper secondary levels can also be combined (as with vocational general subject courses).

Participation
There were 216 000 students enrolled in municipal adult education in 2014, or approximately 3 per cent of the population aged 20-64 years. The vast majority, over 160 000 students, study at upper secondary level. On average every student took part in four courses. Over 70% of the 817 000 participants in individual courses completed the course. Almost 20% discontinued the course. This has been the completion rate for the past ten years. 

The number of students in municipal adult education increased in 2013 compared to the year before. The growth occurred mainly at the upper secondary level, where the number of students increased by 7 000; the number of students remained unchanged at the basic level. The number of students in adult education has varied widely over time, especially as a result of the Adult Education Initiative (Kunskapslyftet) and the ongoing investment in vocational education. The highest number of students enrolled occurred at the end of the 1990s with over 350 000 students. The number of teachers working in municipal adult education decreased from 9 200 in 2002 to 4 900 in 2014. More data on municipal adult education is available, in Swedish only, through the Swedish National Agency for Education (Skolverket). 


Special education for adults 

Special adult education is for adults with an intellectual disability who want to supplement their education from compulsory school and/or upper secondary school. Individuals with development disabilities or brain impairments have the right to participate in special education for adults from the second half of the calendar year in which they reach the age of 20. Students lacking such knowledge which the education aims to provide, and who fulfill the conditions to benefit from the education are eligible to participate.
 
The home municipality is responsible for providing education for those who have the desire and the right to participate in education at compulsory school level. Each municipality should actively work to inform adults in the municipality of their right to participate, and encourage them to do so. Adult special education shares a curriculum with adult education (Läroplan för vuxenutbildningen 2012), but it has its own syllabi.  Adult education for individuals with learning disabilities consists of:
  • Basic adult education for individuals with learning disabilities, which corresponds to the compulsory special school level.
  • The upper secondary school for individuals with learning disabilities, which is equivalent to national or specially designed programs in the upper secondary school for individuals with learning disabilities.

Organisation and assessment 
Teaching takes place as subject courses with the object of providing knowledge equivalent to compulsory school and upper secondary school for those with learning disabilities. Adult education for individuals with learning disabilities has its own syllabi and time schedules. These time schedules are only guidelines, so that the teaching can be adapted to the needs and abilities of each participant. Students can choose to study a single course or a combination of courses.

Grades are specified by A, B, C, D or E. A student who has not achieved at least a grade E receives a certificate of participation in the course.  The rating F and the horizontal line shall not be used in special education. In adult education equivalent to the "training school", which is for pupils with profound learning disabilities, a certificate will be issued showing that the pupil took part in the course.
 
Participation
There were 4 245 students in special education for adults during the academic year 2014/15, most of whom studied at the compulsory school level. The number of students has decreased in recent years. On average the groups consist of three students studying 3.5 hours per week.  Students in special education for adults at upper secondary level study on average 4.7 hours per week. Approximately 400 teachers work in special education for adults and 90% of them have a teaching degree.  More data on special adult education is available, in Swedish only, through the Swedish National Agency for Education (Skolverket). 

Swedish tuition for immigrants

Swedish tuition for immigrants (svenska för invandrare, SFI) is advanced language education which aims to give adults with a mother tongue other than Swedish basic knowledge of the Swedish language. Through this educational provision, students develop a functional second-language ability in Swedish. The education should provide language tools for communication and active participation in daily, societal and working life. The education also aims to give adult immigrants who lack basic reading and writing skills the opportunity for acquiring such skills. Tuition is free of charge for students. Each municipality must as soon as possible, and at the latest within three months, ensure that tuition is offered to any new resident in the municipality who lacks basic knowledge of the Swedish language. There are also folk high schools that provide Swedish tuition for immigrants.

The educational provision is organised within courses. Study plans are personalised and are tailored to the needs of each individual. Adaptation to individual needs ensures that genuine opportunities are provided for students to influence the structure and organisation of the education. The principal organiser should in cooperation with the Swedish Public Employment Service try to make sure that students are given the chance to practise their Swedish language skills in working life. To this end, Swedish tuition for immigrants can be combined with other relevant activities, such as an orientation to working life in Sweden, validation of previous educational attainment, and opportunities for work experience. It should also be possible to combine the education with regular employment.

Admission requirements
The right to Swedish tuition for immigrants is held by individuals who are resident in Sweden, have reached the age of 16 from the second half of the calendar year and who also lack the basic knowledge in Swedish which the education aims to provide. The right also applies to Finnish citizens who are working permanently in Swedish municipalities but live in Finland close to the Swedish border and who otherwise fulfill the conditions. However, it does not apply to adults who have a knowledge of Danish or Norwegian, as in these cases instruction in Swedish is not considered necessary.

Assessment and progression
The education should provide language tools for communication and active participation in daily, societal and working life. The education aims to provide students with communicative language skills. This means being able to communicate, both orally and in writing, according to students’ own needs and circumstances. The starting point for the education should be determined by the needs and life circumstances of each individual learner. In addition, the education also aims to give adult immigrants who lack basic reading and writing skills the opportunity for acquiring such skills. This group of students includes those who are illiterate (in any language) with little school background, as well as those who are able to read and write but are accustomed to a different type of writing system (e.g., languages that use something other than the Roman, or Latin, alphabet). Grades should be awarded at the end of each completed course. The grading scale has five pass levels (E, D, C, B and A) and a fail grade, F. If the teacher does not have sufficient material for assessing the student's knowledge due to absenteeism, a grade should not be awarded, and this should be registered by a dash. Knowledge requirements are specified for three of the grades: E, C and A.

Certification
Those participants who do not achieve a "Pass" are given a certificate showing their level of knowledge in relation to the goals of the syllabus.

Teaching methods and approaches
The syllabus is determined by the government and describes three different study paths depending on the individual's level of knowledge, experience and study goals. The syllabus enables the student to combine or integrate courses in Swedish tuition for immigrants with studies in upper secondary school, basic or upper secondary adult education, special adult education, practical work-place experience, employment or other work-related activities. Studies in Swedish tuition for immigrants are to be adapted to the needs of each individual, and the courses are to be characterised by flexibility. 

Participation
In 2013 there were 358 different providers of Swedish tuition for immigrants, of which 277 were municipalities, 26 folk high schools, 5 study associations and 50 other types of organisations, including companies. Approximately 114 000 people took part in Swedish for Immigrants in 2013, which is an increase of five per cent since the year before and more than three times  as many as in 2000. For more information, in Swedish only, see the Swedish National Agency for Education (Skolverket). 

Provision to Achieve a Recognised Qualification during Adulthood 

Municipal adult education

Municipal adult education is offered at two levels and both lead to recognised qualifications.
  • Basic adult education covers the first 9 years of secondary school.
  • Upper secondary adult education gives adults knowledge and skills at a level equivalent to upper secondary school. This education programme consists of courses at different levels. Students receive a grade after each completed course.
Many individuals take part in municipal adult education to take the courses they need in order to meet the eligibility requirements for university studies. Municipal adult education offers courses that give students both general and specific eligibility. For more information on qualifications and eligibility for higher education after completing municipal adult education, see the Swedish Council for Higher Education (Universitets- och högskolerådet).  There were 216 000 students enrolled in municipal adult education in 2014, or approximately 3 per cent of the population aged 20-64 years. The vast majority, or over 160 000 students, study at upper secondary level.

Folk high schools

All folk high schools hold the general course, suitable for those who have not completed their secondary education since it can provide equivalent knowledge. The subjects studied here closely resemble those in comprehensive schools or upper secondary schools. There is no centrally established curriculum, as each school determines its own programme. The participants study from one to three years depending on their previous educational background, and the lowest age of admission is normally 18 years. The general course at the folk high schools has been ascribed a specific level of qualification by the government and the Swedish Council for Higher Education. This course may be equated with the upper secondary school, which means that participants may qualify for higher education and university studies through a certificate (Eligibility for Higher Education) verifying their knowledge.

A person who has completed a one- to three-year course of studies at a folk high school and who has achieved results corresponding to a “Pass” in the core subject courses at upper secondary school shall be deemed to have ‘basic eligibility’ for higher education. The length of the studies required depends on the extent of the student’s previous studies and work experience. Each academic year at a folk high school comprises at least 30 weeks of full-time study. Those applying to higher education with a certificate from a folk high school do so in a particular category.

The general course had 11 500 participants in 2013.  For more information, see Swedish National Council of Adult Education (Folkbildningsrådet).


Provision Targeting the Transition to the Labour Market 

During 2013, over one million people were registered with the Public Employment Agency (Arbetsförmedlingen). More than 450 000 of these have found new employment, and more than 50 000 have gone on to increase their qualifications through further studies. Many others are participating in labour market measures that are improving their employment opportunities.

Labour market training
Labour market training (arbetsmarknadsutbildning) is mainly vocationally oriented adult education that is given priority on labour market policy grounds and directed towards persons who are at least 25 years old, and who are, or who are at risk of becoming, unemployed. It is either a form of retraining to update knowledge and skills or new vocational training. The programmes are most often organised by private educational providers; some programmes are organised by university colleges with a special orientation. Decisions on labour market training are made by the Swedish Public Employment Service. The training comes under the responsibility of the Ministry of Employment. 

After completing labour market training a certificate is issued by the organiser of the educational provision. The kind of certificate varies depending on the type of education – programmes related to a certain industry may provide industry-specific certification, whilst other education programmes lead to a more general certificate. The type of certificate issued is decided in agreement with the employment agency at the time the education is procured.
 
58 247 people took part in labour market training in 2012, an increase of nearly 15 000 people compared to the year before. SEK 1 981 million was invested in labour market training in 2013. 

Vocational introduction employment 
From January 2014 employers can employ young people aged 15–24 within the framework of vocational introduction employment (yrkesintroduktionsanställning). Most vocational introduction agreements are based on supervision and training being offered at least 25% of working hours. Employers who employ young people within the framework of vocational introduction agreements may be eligible to receive financial assistance corresponding to ordinary employers’ social security contribu¬tions and a supervisor grant of SEK 2 500 per month. The courses last six months or longer if it is needed to fulfill the educational aims. Approximately 900 people took part in vocational introduction employment in 2014. 

Folk high school course to enhance study motivation 
A folk high school course to enhance study motivation among the unemployed (Studiemotiverande folkhögskolekurs) is a national labour market policy measure that started in 2010. The target group is unemployed young people, 16-25 years, registered at the Public Employment Service, who have not completed compulsory or upper secon¬dary education. The initiative is available to young people from their first day of unemployment. The initiative is also for people over 25 participating in the Swedish Job and Development Programme, who have not completed compulsory or upper secon¬dary education. The course comprises a range of elements, including the revision of different curriculum areas (i.e. 'basic skills'), reinforcement of study skills, but also educational and vocational guidance. The aim of the programme is to increase participants’ motivation to return to and complete their regular education. The course is offered at 129 folk high schools and approximately 6 000 people will complete it in 2015. 

For more information on adult education provision targeting the transition to the labour market, see The Swedish Public Employment Service (Arbetsförmedlingen). 


Provision of Liberal (Popular) Adult Education 

Folk high schools 

The first folk high schools (folkhögskolor) were established in Sweden in 1868, and there are now 151 such schools in the country. Despite being separate, folk high schools are now a popular, important and established part of the Swedish education system. One hundred eight of the schools are run by various civic or social movement organisations and associations, whilst the remaining 43 are run by municipalities or county councils. The overall objective of the Swedish folk high school is to provide general civic education. Integral to this aim is to provide not only knowledge and skills, thus raising educational standards, but also to provide experiences and social awareness leading to broader and deeper democratic participation.

The subjects studied at folk high schools closely resemble those in comprehensive school or upper secondary school, although a different approach may be adopted. There is no centrally established curriculum, as each school determines its own programme. At the same time, the content of the course will cover a wide spectrum of subjects, and a variety of optional subjects is usually offered.

All folk high schools offer a general course (allmän kurs), suitable for those who have not completed their secondary education. The general course aims to give participants the necessary qualifications to enter higher education or jobs requiring high school qualifications. The general course must represent at least 15% of folk high schools' programming for them to receive public financing or government grants.


Admission requirements
Folk high schools are for all adults over the age of 18. There are no special entrance requirements for the general course at folk high schools. Individuals can start at varying levels depending on their school background. The more specialised courses,, however, have entrance requirements in the form of prior knowledge or work samples. The stakeholders in liberal adult education themselves formulate their own admission requirements, eligibility requirements and restrictions. 

Teaching method
The adult education system aims to use participants' previous education and experiences to deepen and develop their knowledge as a basis for work, further study and participation in society. The means for achieving this objective are not centrally regulated. Rather, each individual organiser decides how to arrange the educational provision, and the teachers are free to choose their own teaching methods. Each folk high school determines its own profile and approaches. It is a common approach, however, for students to work together in small groups. Computers and other ICT solutions are also often used, and distance studies are highly prominent as well.

Assessment
The folk high schools have their own assessment system, set up according to guidelines from the Swedish National Council of Adult Education (Folkbildningsrådet). There are no grades for individual courses; instead, an overall study assessment is provided for a year-long course. The general course can confer eligibility for higher education courses. A folk high school can issue a certificate showing that a student has knowledge equivalent to upper secondary studies, or it can issue a certificate of basic eligibility or special eligibility. For the special courses, students are given a certificate after they complete a course.

The general course at the folk high schools has been ascribed a specific level of qualification by the government and the Swedish Council for Higher Education. This course may be equated with the upper secondary school level, which means that participants may qualify for higher education and university studies through a certificate verifying their knowledge.

A person who has completed a one- to three-year course of studies at a folk high school and who has achieved results corresponding to “Pass” in the core subject courses at upper secondary school shall be deemed to have ‘basic eligibility’ for higher education. The length of the studies required for this “basic eligibility” depends on the extent of the student’s previous studies and work experience.

Participation
The Swedish National Council of Adult Education presents the following numbers regarding participation in folk high school courses in 2013: 
  • 85 000 people participated in the shorter courses
  • 28 500 people participated in the longer courses 
  • The general course had 11 500 participants
  • 16 400 people participated in school-specific courses and
  • 2 700 cultural programmes were arranged for the general public, and approximately 243 000 people took part in these.  

The Swedish National Council of Adult Education (Folkbildningsrådet) offers more information, in Swedish only. 

Folk high school course for the newly arrived 
The government has commissioned the Public Employment Agency (Arbetsförmedlingen) to offer introductory courses of six months for certain newly arrived immigrants (Etableringskurs på folkhögskola). The courses are offered in collaboration with the Swedish National Council of Adult Education (Folkbildningsrådet) at folk high schools. In 2014, 1 100 people took part in the training at 66 different folk high schools. The aim is to offer the course to 2 400 people in 2015 at 94 folk high schools. The course consists of full-time training over a period of six months for a total of 130 days of training. The folk high schools receive compensation of SEK 50 000 per student place. Those with a limited educational background are prioritised when places are allocated.

Study associations
Study associations (studieförbund) offer a range of educational activities, the most important form of which is the study circle (studiecirkel). In the study circle, a small group meets to learn together based on a plan of study and assisted by a study circle leader. There are study circles in hundreds of different subjects. Some have a more theoretical emphasis, such as language, history and studies in current social issues. Others are more practically oriented, such as dance, woodworking, instrumental music and so forth. The study associations are also Sweden’s largest organiser of cultural events. By arranging cultural events and lectures, the study associations contribute to a rich cultural life throughout the country. The ten study associations have 374 member organisations, nearly 280 000 study circles with almost 1.8 million participants, or 664 000 individual participants (many taking part in several study circles). Many more people take part in the 341 000 cultural programmes each year. The Swedish National Council of Adult Education (Folkbildningsrådet) distributes grants to the study associations. 


Other Types of Publicly Subsidised Provision for Adult Learners 

Distance learning

Municipal adult education, education for adults with intellectual impairments, Swedish tuition for immigrants, liberal adult education and labour market training are available in all municipalities. Advanced vocational education programmes are offered all over the country. Distance learning is used to facilitate such adult education opportunities for students in sparsely populated areas. In fact, distance learning is promoted as an option for all students irrespective of whether they live in sparsely populated areas or not.

The proportion of students in adult education studying without scheduled teaching times (e.g., remotely) has increased over time. In 2013, 18 per cent of students studied without a course schedule, compared with 12 per cent five years earlier. The majority of the students who choose distance learning study at the upper secondary level; only five per cent of those who study at the basic level chose distance learning in 2013. In total there are approximately 36 000 people taking part in municipal adult education via distance learning.