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Portugal:Teaching and Learning in Vocational Upper Secondary Education

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Overview Portugal

Contents

Portugal:Political, Social and Economic Background and Trends

Portugal:Historical Development

Portugal:Main Executive and Legislative Bodies

Portugal:Population: Demographic Situation, Languages and Religions

Portugal:Political and Economic Situation

Portugal:Organisation and Governance

Portugal:Fundamental Principles and National Policies

Portugal:Lifelong Learning Strategy

Portugal:Organisation of the Education System and of its Structure

Portugal:Organisation of Private Education

Portugal:National Qualifications Framework

Portugal:Administration and Governance at Central and/or Regional Level

Portugal:Administration and Governance at Local and/or Institutional Level

Portugal:Statistics on Organisation and Governance

Portugal:Funding in Education

Portugal:Early Childhood and School Education Funding

Portugal:Higher Education Funding

Portugal:Adult Education and Training Funding

Portugal:Early Childhood Education and Care

Portugal:Organisation of Programmes for Children under 3 years

Portugal:Teaching and Learning in Programmes for Children under 3 years

Portugal:Assessment in Programmes for Children under 3 years

Portugal:Organisation of Programmes for Children over 3 years

Portugal:Teaching and Learning in Programmes for Children over 3 years

Portugal:Assessment in Programmes for Children over 3 years

Portugal:Organisational Variations and Alternative Structures in Early Childhood Education and Care

Portugal:Single Structure Education (Integrated Primary and Lower Secondary Education)

Portugal:Organisation of Single Structure Education

Portugal:Teaching and Learning in Single Structure Education

Portugal:Assessment in Single Structure Education

Portugal:Organisational Variations and Alternative Structures in Single Structure Education

Portugal:Upper Secondary and Post-Secondary Non-Tertiary Education

Portugal:Organisation of General Upper Secondary Education

Portugal:Teaching and Learning in General Upper Secondary Education

Portugal:Assessment in General Upper Secondary Education

Portugal:Organisation of Vocational Upper Secondary Education

Portugal:Teaching and Learning in Vocational Upper Secondary Education

Portugal:Assessment in Vocational Upper Secondary Education

Portugal:Organisation of Post-Secondary Non-Tertiary Education

Portugal:Teaching and Learning in Post-Secondary Non-Tertiary Education

Portugal:Assessment in Post-Secondary Non-Tertiary Education

Portugal:Higher Education

Portugal:Types of Higher Education Institutions

Portugal:First Cycle Programmes

Portugal:Bachelor

Portugal:Short-Cycle Higher Education

Portugal:Second Cycle Programmes

Portugal:Programmes outside the Bachelor and Master Structure

Portugal:Third Cycle (PhD) Programmes

Portugal:Adult Education and Training

Portugal:Distribution of Responsibilities

Portugal:Developments and Current Policy Priorities

Portugal:Main Providers

Portugal:Main Types of Provision

Portugal:Validation of Non-formal and Informal Learning

Portugal:Teachers and Education Staff

Portugal:Initial Education for Teachers Working in Early Childhood and School Education

Portugal:Conditions of Service for Teachers Working in Early Childhood and School Education

Portugal:Continuing Professional Development for Teachers Working in Early Childhood and School Education

Portugal:Initial Education for Academic Staff in Higher Education

Portugal:Conditions of Service for Academic Staff Working in Higher Education

Portugal:Continuing Professional Development for Academic Staff Working in Higher Education

Portugal:Initial Education for Teachers and Trainers Working in Adult Education and Training

Portugal:Conditions of Service for Teachers and Trainers Working in Adult Education and Training

Portugal:Continuing Professional Development for Teachers and Trainers Working in Adult Education and Training

Portugal:Management and Other Education Staff

Portugal:Management Staff for Early Childhood and School Education

Portugal:Staff Involved in Monitoring Educational Quality for Early Childhood and School Education

Portugal:Education Staff Responsible for Guidance in Early Childhood and School Education

Portugal:Other Education Staff or Staff Working with Schools

Portugal:Management Staff for Higher Education

Portugal:Other Education Staff or Staff Working in Higher Education

Portugal:Management Staff Working in Adult Education and Training

Portugal:Other Education Staff or Staff Working in Adult Education and Training

Portugal:Quality Assurance

Portugal:Quality Assurance in Early Childhood and School Education

Portugal:Quality Assurance in Higher Education

Portugal:Quality Assurance in Adult Education and Training

Portugal:Educational Support and Guidance

Portugal:Special Education Needs Provision within Mainstream Education

Portugal:Separate Special Education Needs Provision in Early Childhood and School Education

Portugal:Support Measures for Learners in Early Childhood and School Education

Portugal:Guidance and Counselling in Early Childhood and School Education

Portugal:Support Measures for Learners in Higher Education

Portugal:Guidance and Counselling in Higher Education

Portugal:Support Measures for Learners in Adult Education and Training

Portugal:Guidance and Counselling in a Lifelong Learning Approach

Portugal:Mobility and Internationalisation

Portugal:Mobility in Early Childhood and School Education

Portugal:Mobility in Higher Education

Portugal:Mobility in Adult Education and Training

Portugal:Other Dimensions of Internationalisation in Early Childhood and School Education

Portugal:Other Dimensions of Internationalisation in Higher Education

Portugal:Other Dimensions of Internationalisation in Adult Education and Training

Portugal:Bilateral Agreements and Worldwide Cooperation

Portugal:Ongoing Reforms and Policy Developments

Portugal:National Reforms in Early Childhood Education and Care

Portugal:National Reforms in School Education

Portugal:National Reforms in Vocational Education and Training and Adult Learning

Portugal:National Reforms in Higher Education

Portugal:National Reforms related to Transversal Skills and Employability

Portugal:European Perspective

Portugal:Legislation

Portugal:Institutions

Portugal:Glossary

Curriculum, Subjects, Number of Hours

 

Professional Courses

The aim of these courses is to develop personal and vocational competences, preparing the learners who attend them for entry into the employment market or for post-upper secondary training or higher education, if they wish.

The courses being run cover several education and training areas, which are published online on the Offer Network for training cycle 2016-2019.

The curricular structure of these courses is divided into modules, which offers greater flexibility and allows for the different learning speeds of each student.

The curricular model of Vocational Courses includes the following training components: sociocultural, scientific and technical.

The sociocultural training component involves a total timetable of 1,000 hours and aims to contribute to the building of students’ personal, social and cultural identity and includes the following subjects:

  • Portuguese: 320 hours;
  • Foreign Language I, II or III: 220 hours;
  • Integration Area: 220 hours;
  • Information and Communication Technologies: 100 hours;
  • Physical Education: 140 hours.

The aim of the scientific training component is to help students acquire and develop a body of basic scientific knowledge and skills of the respective course. It includes 2-3 basic scientific subjects to be stipulated according to the vocational qualifications to be acquired and lasts a total of 500 hours.

The aim of the technical training component is to help students acquire and develop a body of technological, technical and practical knowledge integral to the vocational qualification envisaged. It includes 3 to 4 subjects which last a total of 1,100 hours. This training component must include training in the workplace, which lasts between 600 to 840 hours, so that students acquire and develop technical, relational and organizational skills relevant to the qualification envisaged.

The total workload, which varies between 3,200 and 3,440 hours, is not compartmentalised by the three-year training cycle. It is managed by the school as part of its pedagogical autonomy, safeguarding the balance of the annual timetable, in order to optimise modular management and training in a work context.

In relation to the technical component, it is also worth noting that some vocational courses are already arranged according to the training framework of the National Qualifications Catalogue.

The school manuals are adopted for the training cycle of the professional course in which the subject is integrated, for the totality of the subject and not for the academic year, respecting the school’s pedagogic autonomy in the management of the teaching load.

 

Education and Training Courses

As these courses are part of the National Qualifications System (NQS), they include the basic level (2nd and 3rd cycles) and upper-secondary education and training and allow dual certification - academic and vocational.

The courses cover several education and training areas and there is a complete listing at ANQEP’s webpage.

Each course corresponds to an education/training stage (from Type 1 to Type 7). Access to these stages depends on the academic and vocational qualifications of each trainee. The different types of secondary level training pathways, the components, the training areas and school and vocational certification that they confer can be found on the ANQEP, I.P. site.

The ETC training paths have to fulfil the following minimum duration as stipulated in the curriculum programmes:

  • Training path: Type 4 -Minimum length: 1,230 hours;
  • Training path: Complementary Training Course - Minimum length: 1,020 hours;
  • Training path: Type 5 -Minimum length: 2,276 hours;
  • Training path: Type 6 - Minimum length: 1,380 hours;
  • Training paths: Type 7 - Minimum length: 1,155 hours 

The curriculum programmes of all ETC types are divided into four training components: sociocultural training, scientific training, technological training and practical training.

The sociocultural and scientific training is geared towards acquiring skills in languages, culture and communication, citizenship and society and in the different applied sciences using interdisciplinary and cross-cutting method in terms of instrumental learning. They are divided into subjects and focus on personal, social and professional development.

The technological training is divided into units or modules, possibly associated with subjects, according to the skills that define the professional qualification envisaged.

The practical training is part of an individual training plan to be developed in the workplace and aims to facilitate the acquisition and development of technical, relational, organisational and career management skills.


Apprenticeship Courses

The curricular model of Apprenticeship Courses includes the following training components: sociocultural, scientific technological and practical.

The sociocultural training component involves a minimum total workload of 700 hours and a maximum of 800. It aims to contribute to the building of students’ personal, social and cultural identity and prepare them to use new technologies:

The scientific training component has a minimum workload of 200 hours and a maximum of 400. Its aim is to help students the basic scientific knowledge and skills of the respective course.

The technological training component has a total minimum workload of 800 hours and a maximum of 1,000. Its aim is to help students acquire knowledge and skills that are specific and necessary to the profession and it respects the training frameworks of the National Qualifications Catalogue.

The practical training component has a minimum total workload of 1,100 hours and a maximum of 1,500. Its aim is to help students acquire and develop knowledge and technical, relational and organisational skills that are relevant to the respective profession. This component is undertaken within a work context, using a combined academic/vocational approach throughout the training process.


Curriculum Structure of Apprenticeship Courses – level 4

Training Components

Skills Areas

Training Areas (divided into short-term training units – STTU)

Sociocultural

Languages, Culture and Communication

- Living in Portuguese
- Communicating in a Foreign Language
- Information and Communication Technologies

Citizenship and Society

- Today’s World
- Social and Personal Development

Scientific

Basic Sciences

- Mathematics and Reality
- Others

Technological

Technologies

- Specific Technologies

Practical

Work Context

The total length of training varies between 2,800 hours and 3,700 hours, according to the knowledge required by the different qualifications. In addition to this, there can be up to 90 hours, 30 of which are dedicated to support activities for trainees, such as recovery plans, and the remaining 60 hours for transdisciplinary projects, in the community, for example, which should be defined in specific regulations. 

 

Specialised Artistic Education Courses

In upper-secondary education, curricula in the areas of Visual Arts and Audio-visual Arts, Dance and Music are divided into training components.

The general training component, which aims to help construct a learner’s personal, social and cultural identity, is the same in the four courses and includes the following subjects:

  • Portuguese: 10th and 11th year – 180 minutes a week; 12th year – 200 minutes a week per year of schooling;
  • Foreign Language I, II or III: 10th and 11th year – 150 minutes a week per year of schooling;
  • Philosophy: 10th and 11th year – 150 minutes a week per year of schooling;
  • Physical Education (with the exception of the Dance course): 10th, 11th and 12th year – 150 minutes a week per year of schooling.

The scientific training component, which aims for students to acquire and develop a body of knowledge and basic skills of the respective course.

In what concerns to Visual Arts is the same on courses of Communication Design, Product Design and Artistic Production, including the following subjects:

  • History of Culture and the Arts: 10th, 11th and 12th year – 180 minutes a week by year of schooling;
  • Descriptive Geometry A: 11th and 12th year – 270 minutes a week by year of schooling;
  • Biennial subject option (Image and Sound B; Mathematics; School Provision): 11th and 12th year – 180 minutes a week by year of schooling.

In the case of the Audio-visual Communication Course:

  • History of Culture and the Arts: 10th, 11th and 12th year – 180 minutes a week per year of schooling;
  • Image and Sound A: 11th and 12th year – 270 minutes a week per year of schooling;
  • Biennial subject (Descriptive Geometry B or Mathematics or school provision): 11th and 12th year – 180 minutes a week per year of schooling.

In the area of Music, it is the same in the following four courses: Dance, Music, Singing and Gregorian Chant, and includes the following subjects:

  • History of Culture and the Arts: 10th, 11th and 12th year – 135 minutes a week per year of schooling;
  • Musical training: 10th, 11th and 12th year – 90 minutes a week per year of schooling;
  • Composition Analysis and Technique: 10th, 11th and 12th year – 135 minutes a week per year of schooling;
  • Complementary provision (optional): 10th, 11th and 12th year – 90 minutes a week per year of schooling.

In the case of the Dance course:

  • History of Culture and the Arts: 110th, 11th and 12th year – 135 minutes a week per year of schooling;
  • Music: 10th, 11th and 12th year – 90 minutes a week per year of schooling;
  • Complementary provision (optional): 10th, 11th and 12th year – 90 minutes a week per year of schooling.

The technical-artistic training component, which aims for learners to acquire and develop a body of knowledge and basic competences of the respective course, involves specific ways of learning within a work context. (when applicable), including the following subjects:

  • Visual Arts and Audio-visual Arts;
  • Drawing A: 10th, 11th and 12th year – 250 minutes a week per year of schooling;
  • Project work and Technology: 10th,and 11th year – 360 minutes a week; 12th year – 720 minutes a week (part of in-service training) per year of schooling;
  • Biennial subject (Applied Physics and Chemistry, Arts Management, school provision): 11th and 12th – 180 minutes a week per year of schooling.

Dance and Music

  • the subjects vary according to the vocational area of each course, as does the minimum workload;
  • Dance: 3,060 minutes a week per cycle total;
  • Music: 765 minutes a week per cycle total;
  • Singing: 1,305 minutes a week per cycle total;
  • Gregorian Chant: 1,035 minutes a week per cycle total.

The courses in the visual arts, audio-visual and dance feature is also training in the workplace, with a workload 120-132 hours.

 

Vocational Courses

The curriculum development of these upper-secondary courses should be part of the National Qualifications System (Catálogo Nacional de Profissões - CNQ), with reference made to the National Qualifications Catalogue, and correspond to a Level 4 qualification in the National Qualifications Framework.

The curriculum model of upper-secondary vocational courses includes the following training components, with the following timetable minimums:

  • General Component, 600 hours, including Portuguese, Communicating in English and Physical Education;
  • Complementary Component, 300 hours, including Applied Mathematics and School Provision;
  • Vocational Component, 700 hours;
  • Internship, 1,400 hours, which includes internship training in a work context and short training courses (National Qualifications Catalogue technological training).

The general and complementary training subjects are organised in coordination with the vocational component and by modules, and whenever possible should make reference to the syllabus of subjects belonging to the sociocultural and scientific components of vocational courses in order to meet the requirements of desired professional purpose.

The vocational component and the internship component are associated with the technological component of a level 4 NQC qualification, within a flexible framework, attempting to adhere to professional profiles and ensure the completion of at least 1000 hours, divided into short-term training units of (STTU) the respective technological component.

The internship can be done via an alternating model throughout the training process, between actual training within companies and practical training in short-term training sessions, which make up the respective training framework. This internship takes place in companies or other institutions that provide vocational courses in conjunction with schools.

Teaching Methods and Materials

In what concerns teaching methods and materials teachers have autonomy to decide which method to use, although at school level processes and methodologies might be adopted, as well as pedagogical materials to be shared among teachers from the school or school cluster.