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Poland:Support Measures for Learners in Early Childhood and School Education

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Overview Poland

Contents

Poland:Political, Social and Economic Background and Trends

Poland:Historical Development

Poland:Main Executive and Legislative Bodies

Poland:Population: Demographic Situation, Languages and Religions

Poland:Political and Economic Situation

Poland:Organisation and Governance

Poland:Fundamental Principles and National Policies

Poland:Lifelong Learning Strategy

Poland:Organisation of the Education System and of its Structure

Poland:Organisation of Private Education

Poland:National Qualifications Framework

Poland:Administration and Governance at Central and/or Regional Level

Poland:Administration and Governance at Local and/or Institutional Level

Poland:Statistics on Organisation and Governance

Poland:Funding in Education

Poland:Early Childhood and School Education Funding

Poland:Higher Education Funding

Poland:Adult Education and Training Funding

Poland:Early Childhood Education and Care

Poland:Organisation of Programmes for Children under 2-3 years

Poland:Teaching and Learning in Programmes for Children under 2-3 years

Poland:Assessment in Programmes for Children under 2-3 years

Poland:Organisation of Programmes for Children over 2-3 years

Poland:Teaching and Learning in Programmes for Children over 2-3 years

Poland:Assessment in Programmes for Children over 2-3 years

Poland:Organisational Variations and Alternative Structures in Early Childhood Education and Care

Poland:Primary Education

Poland:Organisation of Primary Education

Poland:Teaching and Learning in Primary Education

Poland:Assessment in Primary Education

Poland:Organisational Variations and Alternative Structures in Primary Education

Poland:Secondary and Post-Secondary Non-Tertiary Education

Poland:Organisation of General Lower Secondary Education

Poland:Teaching and Learning in General Lower Secondary Education

Poland:Assessment in General Lower Secondary Education

Poland:Organisation of General Upper Secondary Education

Poland:Teaching and Learning in General Upper Secondary Education

Poland:Assessment in General Upper Secondary Education

Poland:Organisation of Vocational Upper Secondary Education

Poland:Teaching and Learning in Vocational Upper Secondary Education

Poland:Assessment in Vocational Upper Secondary Education

Poland:Organisation of Post-Secondary Non-Tertiary Education

Poland:Teaching and Learning in Post-Secondary Non-Tertiary Education

Poland:Assessment in Post-Secondary Non-Tertiary Education

Poland:Higher Education

Poland:Types of Higher Education Institutions

Poland:First Cycle Programmes

Poland:Bachelor

Poland:Short-Cycle Higher Education

Poland:Second Cycle Programmes

Poland:Programmes outside the Bachelor and Master Structure

Poland:Third Cycle (PhD) Programmes

Poland:Adult Education and Training

Poland:Distribution of Responsibilities

Poland:Developments and Current Policy Priorities

Poland:Main Providers

Poland:Main Types of Provision

Poland:Validation of Non-formal and Informal Learning

Poland:Teachers and Education Staff

Poland:Initial Education for Teachers Working in Early Childhood and School Education

Poland:Conditions of Service for Teachers Working in Early Childhood and School Education

Poland:Continuing Professional Development for Teachers Working in Early Childhood and School Education

Poland:Initial Education for Academic Staff in Higher Education

Poland:Conditions of Service for Academic Staff Working in Higher Education

Poland:Continuing Professional Development for Academic Staff Working in Higher Education

Poland:Initial Education for Teachers and Trainers Working in Adult Education and Training

Poland:Conditions of Service for Teachers and Trainers Working in Adult Education and Training

Poland:Continuing Professional Development for Teachers and Trainers Working in Adult Education and Training

Poland:Management and Other Education Staff

Poland:Management Staff for Early Childhood and School Education

Poland:Staff Involved in Monitoring Educational Quality for Early Childhood and School Education

Poland:Education Staff Responsible for Guidance in Early Childhood and School Education

Poland:Other Education Staff or Staff Working with Schools

Poland:Management Staff for Higher Education

Poland:Other Education Staff or Staff Working in Higher Education

Poland:Management Staff Working in Adult Education and Training

Poland:Other Education Staff or Staff Working in Adult Education and Training

Poland:Quality Assurance

Poland:Quality Assurance in Early Childhood and School Education

Poland:Quality Assurance in Higher Education

Poland:Quality Assurance in Adult Education and Training

Poland:Educational Support and Guidance

Poland:Special Education Needs Provision within Mainstream Education

Poland:Separate Special Education Needs Provision in Early Childhood and School Education

Poland:Support Measures for Learners in Early Childhood and School Education

Poland:Guidance and Counselling in Early Childhood and School Education

Poland:Support Measures for Learners in Higher Education

Poland:Guidance and Counselling in Higher Education

Poland:Support Measures for Learners in Adult Education and Training

Poland:Guidance and Counselling in a Lifelong Learning Approach

Poland:Mobility and Internationalisation

Poland:Mobility in Early Childhood and School Education

Poland:Mobility in Higher Education

Poland:Mobility in Adult Education and Training

Poland:Other Dimensions of Internationalisation in Early Childhood and School Education

Poland:Other Dimensions of Internationalisation in Higher Education

Poland:Other Dimensions of Internationalisation in Adult Education and Training

Poland:Bilateral Agreements and Worldwide Cooperation

Poland:Ongoing Reforms and Policy Developments

Poland:National Reforms in Early Childhood Education and Care

Poland:National Reforms in School Education

Poland:National Reforms in Vocational Education and Training and Adult Learning

Poland:National Reforms in Higher Education

Poland:National Reforms related to Transversal Skills and Employability

Poland:European Perspective

Poland:Legislation

Poland:Institutions

Poland:Glossary

Definition of the target group(s)

Depending on the needs identified, the education system provides children and young people with various forms of support during their education process. Such support is aimed at:

  • offering children and young people best possible conditions for development;
  • reducing the existing disharmony and developmental disorders;
  • ensuring that they acquire knowledge and skills in a way adapted to their abilities and strengths;
  • developing their interests and talents;
  • assisting them in overcoming difficulties, also those resulting from a difficult financial or life situation.

These measures contribute to reducing drop-out rates.

In addition to support offered to children and young people with special educational needs, there are specific support measures aimed at:

  • children and young people from ethnic and national minority backgrounds;
  • children and young people who are non-Polish nationals or Polish nationals of full-time or part-time compulsory school age who do not speak Polish or whose command of Polish is not sufficient to follow mainstream classes;
  • children and young people in a difficult financial situation;
  • children and young people with high learning and sports achievements.

Specific support measures

Specific rules for supporting children and young people and their parents are laid down in the statutes of educational institutions; in the case of alternative preschool education settings, such support measures are left to the discretion of the managing body.

In particular, school statutes define:

  • forms of care and assistance provided to pupils who need help and support, including financial support, due to developmental or family problems, or emergency circumstances;
  • arrangements for additional classes for pupils, taking account of their developmental needs;
  • arrangements for cooperation with counselling and guidance centres and other institutions which offer counselling and specialist support to children and their parents;
  • arrangements for cooperation between schools and parents (legal guardians) in the area of education and problem prevention.

Nursery school statutes define detailed responsibilities of teachers in the field of:

  • cooperation with parents (legal guardians) in the education and upbringing of children, which takes account of parents’ (legal guardians’) right to know tasks resulting from the preschool education curriculum followed in a given class and to obtain information regarding their child, his/her conduct and development;
  • planning and implementing teaching and educational work and assuring its quality;
  • conducting pedagogical observation aimed at the identification of children’s developmental needs, and documenting such observation;
  • cooperating with specialists providing psychological and educational support, health care and other types of care;
  • cooperation with parents, including the forms of such cooperation and the frequency of parent-teacher meetings.

The body managing (an) alternative preschool education setting(s) determines the objectives and tasks of a single setting or a group of them, as well as the method of their implementation, including:

  • supporting children’s individual development;
  • supporting families in educating their children and preparing them for school;
  • in the case of disabled children - with particular emphasis on the type and degree of disability.

The tasks of teachers working in alternative preschool education settings include:

  • conducting pedagogical observation aimed at the identification of children’s developmental needs and abilities;
  • assessing children’s readiness for school;
  • cooperating with specialists providing psychological and educational support and health care.

Schools, except for schools for adults, implement educational programmes which include all contents and educational measures targeting pupils/students, and preventive programmes adapted to pupils’/students’ developmental needs and the needs of a specific community, including all contents and problem prevention measures targeting pupils/students, teachers and parents.

Educational and problem prevention programmes are adopted by the parents’ council in consultation with the teaching council of a school.

The Republic of Poland guarantees Polish citizens who are members of national and ethnic minorities the freedom to preserve and develop their own language, rituals and traditions and to develop their own culture.

Poland recognises the following minorities as national minorities:

  • Byelorussian
  • Czech
  • Lithuanian
  • German
  • Armenian
  • Russian
  • Slovak
  • Ukrainian
  • Jewish.

Poland recognises the following minorities as ethnic minorities:

  • Karaim
  • Lemko
  • Roma
  • Tatar

Poland recognises the Kashubian language as a regional language.

(Act of 6 January 2005 on national and ethnic minorities and on the regional language: Journal of Law 2015, No. 3, item 573, as subsequently amended)

The school education system enables children and young people from national and ethnic minorities to preserve their sense of national, ethnic, language and religious identity, in particular, to learn their mother tongue, history and culture.

Decisions relating to the participation of children in such classes/courses are left to their parents’ discretion.

At parents’ written and voluntary request, nursery schools, schools or other institutions provide children with the opportunity to learn their mother tongue or learn in their mother tongue, and to attend additional classes/courses maintaining their national or ethnic identity

(Regulation of the Minister of National Education of 14 November 2007 on the arrangements for public nursery schools, schools and educational institutions to undertake activities maintaining national, ethnic and linguistic identity of national and ethnic minority pupils and pupils of the community using the regional language. Journal of Law 2014, item 263)

Where such a request has been submitted by parents:

  • minority or regional language classes/courses become compulsory for the pupil/student, which means that marks for such classes are used to calculate the average mark and influence promotion;
  • the subject/course in minority history and culture is regarded as an additional one, which means that marks for such classes are used to calculate the average mark but do not influence promotion.

Schools may provide classes in the geography of the country that the national minority identifies with. Such classes:

  • are offered to pupils in Grades 4-6 of the primary school and pupils/students in lower and upper secondary school students;
  • are taught for 15 hours at each stage of education;
  • are offered as part of the pool of hours being at the discretion of the school head or hours that the school’s managing body may allocate at the request of the school head.

Depending on the number of applications submitted, such minority / regional language / minority history and culture courses are organised for:

  • classes in schools or other basic units for pupil/student grouping in non-school institutions;
  • groups composed of pupils/students of different grades and classes/units.

Classes taking a minority / regional language course or a course delivered in a minority / regional language are created when at least the following numbers of applications have been submitted:

  • at least 7 in a nursery school;
  • at least 7 in a primary or lower secondary school;
  • at least 14 in an upper secondary school.

In the case of small and dispersed local communities, a minority language / history and culture course is organised for pupils from different schools in inter-school teams. Nursery school pupils can learn minority languages in the same way. Such teams are composed of 3 to 20 children.

Minority or regional languages may be:

  • the language of instruction, except for Polish language teaching at the early school education stage, and except for the Polish language and contents related to Poland in the History and Geography subjects at further stages of education;
  • a second language of instruction - in such cases, at least four compulsory subjects at the 2nd, 3rd and 4th stages of education are taught in two languages (minority / regional languages and the Polish language), except for Polish language classes, History classes concerning the history of Poland and Geography classes concerning the geography of Poland;
  • an additional subject for a pupil/student whose language of instruction is Polish.

Nursery schools may provide:

  • classes in a minority / regional language, however, 4 hours of classes per week should be provided in Polish to children in compulsory one-year preparatory classes;
  • bilingual classes - in Polish and a minority/regional language (in equal proportions);
  • partly in Polish and 4 hours per week in a minority/regional language.

The number of hours of a minority/regional language depends on the way in which it is taught:

  • if this language is an additional subject, there are 3 hours of classes per week;
  • in all other cases the number of hours is 4 or 5.

Upper secondary schools (4th stage of education) may teach minority / regional languages at the extended level. In such cases, in addition to the number of hours allocated to teaching a language at the basic level, at least another 180 hours should be allocated to the course offered by a school.

The minimum number of hours for the history and culture of a minority is 30 hours for the 2nd, 3rd and 4th stages of education.

Teaching the minority / regional language, history, culture and geography of the country that a national minority identifies with is based on curricula approved for use at school by the school head and on textbooks approved for use at school by the Minister of National Education.

Syllabuses

Syllabuses are developed by individual teachers (or a team of teachers) teaching a given subject and presented to their school head who, having consulted the teaching council, approves such syllabuses for use at school and enters them in the school register of syllabuses.

Approval of textbooks for use at school

The minister responsible for school education (or the minister responsible for culture and national heritage in the case of textbooks for education preparing for art occupations in art schools) approves textbooks for use in school after a positive review by experts who are appointed by the minister responsible for school education (or for culture and national heritage) and selected from among those included in the register kept by the minister.

Textbooks are approved for use at school at the request of the entity which has copy rights to a given textbook, after a positive review by experts. Textbooks approved for use at school are entered in registers available to the public on the Ministry’s webpage. There may be paper and electronic versions of a textbook. With their publishers’ consent, electronic textbooks are made available on the education portal ‘Scholaris’.

Textbooks and supplementary books used in the education of pupils/students to the extent necessary to preserve their sense of national, ethnic or language identity may be co-funded from the part of the state budget managed by the minister responsible for school education.

The objectives of teaching minority / regional languages, teaching contents and the requirements to be taken into consideration by teachers developing syllabuses and by the authors of textbooks are defined in the regulations on the core curriculum.

The core curriculum defines general requirements related to the objectives of education and detailed requirements concerning ethnic / minority / regional language teaching contents at the stage of preschool education and all other stages of education.

There is no core curriculum for subjects such as minority history and culture and the geography of the country that a national minority identifies with. However, the authors of textbooks for these subjects are obliged to take account of recommendations issued by bilateral textbook commissions and other textbook commissions and teams acting on the basis of international agreements on cooperation in education or on the basis of UNESCO national committees.

If necessary, schools and nursery schools take additional measures aimed at the preservation and development of the ethnic identity of children and young people of Roma origin and support their education. In particular, these include:

  • remedial classes;
  • employing support teachers trained to work with children in multicultural environments;
  • employing Roma education assistants.

Roma education assistants are employed as a teacher’s assistants. They assist children and young people of Roma origin in contacts with the nursery school or school environment and cooperate with their parents, schools and nursery schools.

Poland has been undertaking systemic measures aimed at Roma integration. These measures are coordinated by the minister competent for religious denominations, ethnic and national minorities and involve other ministries, regional and local government authorities and non-governmental organisations representing the Roma community in particular.

In 2004, Poland launched a governmental programme “The Programme for the Roma Community in Poland for 2004-2013”. It is now carried out as “The governmental programme for Roma community integration in Poland for 2014-2020”.

Educational activities undertaken as part of governmental programmes aim at providing equal educational opportunities to Roma pupils; assisting the youngest Roma children with overcoming barriers in education and adaptation; reducing the proportion of pupils who are not in compulsory education; and raising Roma parents’ awareness of the importance of education for the future of their children.

Local government bodies as the authorities managing schools attended by Roma children, and Roma associations and organisations or those acting for Roma communities all over Poland apply for grants for the implementation of tasks under the governmental programmes.

Local government bodies managing schools which carry out tasks aimed at the preservation of the national, ethnic and language identity of ethnic / national minority pupils and communities speaking regional languages are granted additional resources for the implementation of those tasks as part of general subsidies for school education.

Non-Polish nationals are entitled to receive education and care in all types of public nursery schools and schools on conditions applicable to Polish nationals until they reach the age of 18 or until the completion of upper secondary education.

The following categories of people are entitled to free education in schools for adults and post-secondary schools:

  • nationals of EU Member States, member states of the European Free Trade Association (EFTA) – signatories of the European Economic Area (EEA) agreement or the Swiss Confederation, and members of their families who have a residence permit or permanent residence permit;
  • persons of Polish origin within the meaning of the legislation on repatriation;
  • persons who have been granted a permit for permanent residence in the territory of the Republic of Poland;
  • holders of a valid Card of the Pole/Polish Card;
  • persons who are eligible by virtue of international agreements;
  • persons who have been granted the refugee status and members of their families;
  • persons who have a permit for tolerated stay;
  • persons who have been granted a permission for stay for humanitarian reasons and members of their families;
  • persons who have been granted subsidiary protection and members of their families;
  • persons who have been granted temporary protection in the territory of the Republic of Poland;
  • persons who have been granted an EU long-term resident permit in the territory of the Republic of Poland;
  • persons who have been granted a permit in the territory of the Republic of Poland for temporary residence in order to work in the territory of the Republic of Poland in an occupation requiring high-level qualifications, to reunite with their family or for other reasons specified in Art. 186, section 1, sub-sections 3 or 4, of the Act on Foreigners (Act of 12 December 2013 on Foreigners, Journal of Law 2013, item 1650, as subsequently amended);
  • members of families applying for international protection;
  • persons who have a residence permit with the annotation ‘access to the labour market’, a Schengen visa or a national visa issued for work purposes in the territory of the Republic of Poland.

Non-Polish nationals not listed above may attend public schools for adults, public post-secondary schools, public art schools, public educational institutions and public colleges of social work and take qualification courses as part of continuing education:

  • as holders of a scholarship awarded by the minister responsible for school education;
  • as holders of a scholarship awarded by the body managing a school or educational institution, or by the head of a school or institution;
  • on a fee-paying basis.

Depending on their needs, non-Polish nationals and Polish nationals who have attended a school within the school education system in other countries may:

  • follow a programme where the education process is adjusted to their educational needs;
  • take an additional Polish language course;
  • take additional remedial classes covering the subjects taught;
  • take a course in the language and culture of their country of origin.

(Regulation of the Minister of National Education of 9 September 2016 on the education of non-Polish nationals and Polish nationals who have attended schools within school education systems in other countries (Journal of Law 2016, item 1453)

Preparatory class

The body managing a public school may establish a preparatory class for pupils/students of full-time compulsory education age coming from other countries who:

  • have no knowledge or insufficient knowledge of the Polish language to follow a mainstream education programme;
  • require adjusting the education process to their educational needs;
  • require adjusting organisational arrangements to increase the effectiveness of their learning process.

Preparatory classes are not established in public art schools, public special schools, public sport schools, public schools of sport championship or public schools for adults.

Teaching in preparatory classes is intended for pupils/students aged:

  • 7 to 10 years: covering Grades 1 to 3 of the primary school;
  • 11 to 13 years: covering Grades 4 to 6 of the primary school;
  • 14 to 16 years: covering Grades 1 to 3 of the lower secondary school;
  • 17 and 18 years: covering Grades 1 to 3 of the general upper secondary school or basic vocational school, or Grades 1 to 4 of the technical upper secondary school, respectively.

Preparatory classes may take pupils/students who:

  • have adaptation difficulties related to cultural differences or a change of the learning environment;
  • have language communication problems resulting, in particular, from crisis or traumatic situations, including armed conflicts, natural disasters or other natural or man-made humanitarian disasters.

Classes in a preparatory class are conducted by teachers responsible for specific subjects/types of classes who may be supported by a person speaking the language of the pupil’s/student’s country of origin, employed as a teacher’s assistant by the school head.

Teaching in a preparatory class is based on the curricula implemented in a given school, with methods and forms adjusted to pupils’/students’ individual developmental and educational needs and psychological and physical abilities.

The following minimum weekly number of hours is allocated to compulsory educational activities in a preparatory class in the school timetable:

  • 20 hours in Grades 1 to 3 of the primary school;
  • 23 hours in Grades 4 to 6 of the primary school;
  • 25 hours in the lower secondary school;
  • 26 hours in schools above the lower secondary level.

The weekly number of hours includes 3 hours per week for the teaching of the Polish language according to a syllabus based on an outline programme for Polish language courses for foreigners (Regulation of the Minister of National Education of 18 February 2011 on the outline programme for Polish language courses for foreigners; Journal of Law No. 61, item 306).

The number of pupils/students in a preparatory class may not exceed 15.

Where a large number of pupils/students coming from abroad are admitted to a public school during the school year, a preparatory class may also be established during the school year.

The head of a public school where a preparatory class has been established should appoint a team to select pupils/students qualifying for the class.

The team is composed of:

  • two teachers,
  • a pedagogue or psychologist.

If qualified by the team and within the resources available, pupils/students of other public schools may enrol in a preparatory class:

  • at the request of a parent or an adult student himself/herself;
  • upon the consent of the body managing the public school which has established a preparatory class.

The period of education in a preparatory class:

  • lasts until the end of educational activities in the school year in which a pupil/student was qualified to enrol in the class;
  • may be shortened or extended by no more than one school year, depending on the progress made in learning by a pupil/student and his/her educational needs.

A decision to shorten or extend the period of education in a preparatory class is taken by the school’s teaching council at the request of:

  • the teacher teaching the pupil/student;
  • a pedagogue or psychologist.

Additional and free-of-charge Polish language classes are provided to:

  • non-Polish nationals;
  • Polish nationals of full-time or part-time compulsory school age who have no knowledge of the Polish language or whose knowledge of the language is not sufficient to follow a mainstream education programme.

Polish language classes:

  • are offered as additional Polish language lessons of at least 2 hours per week;
  • are organised by a given school and the body managing the school;
  • are conducted until pupils/students have mastered the language to the extent enabling them to follow a mainstream programme.

Providing such classes is an educational task of communes (gmina; the lowest local-government level).

These persons may also attend remedial classes in individual subjects, if teachers teaching these subjects see the need to bridge gaps resulting from curricular differences.

Remedial classes in a given subject are conducted:

  • on an individual or collective basis;
  • for 1 hour per week; and
  • for a period not exceeding 12 months.

The total number of hours of additional Polish language classes and remedial classes cannot exceed 5 hours per week.

Non-Polish pupils/students are entitled to support provided by a person speaking their mother tongue and employed at school for a period not exceeding 12 months.

Local government bodies are entitled to receive grants from general subsidies for school education to finance tasks related to the education of pupils/students, regardless of their citizenship.

Like Polish nationals, non-Polish pupils/students take tests and external examinations. Those whose command of Polish and knowledge of Polish culture and traditions is insufficient may use adapted examination sheets, appropriate teaching materials (e.g.: bilingual dictionaries) and have the duration of the examination extended.

Non-Polish nationals of full-time compulsory age may follow a course in the language and culture of their country of origin offered by a diplomatic mission or consulate, or a cultural/educational association for their nationality in cooperation with their school head, if at least 7 persons are interested to participate in such classes. Schools provide premises and teaching aids free of charge, however, the costs of teaching are to be borne by the entity organising such courses.

The school education system provides financial support to pupils/students.

Support can be of maintenance or of incentive type.

Maintenance-type support includes:

  • school grants, and
  • school allowances.

Incentive-type support includes:

  • scholarships for learning or sporting achievements,
  • the Prime Minister’s scholarships,
  • scholarships of the minister responsible for school education, and
  • scholarships of the minister responsible for culture and national heritage.

Pupils may be granted both types of financial support at the same time.

School grants may be awarded to pupils in a difficult financial situation resulting from low per-capita income in the family, in particular when the family is affected by: unemployment, disability, long-lasting illness, a large number of children, parents' inability to provide education and care, alcoholism and drug addiction, single parenthood or exceptional emergency circumstances.

School grants may be awarded in the form of:

  • fully or partly covered costs of participation in classes, including remedial classes, which extend beyond classes provided by schools as part of their curricula, and of participation in classes organised outside the school;
  • in-kind support for education-related expenses, in particular for the purchase of textbooks.

School allowances may be granted to pupils who are temporarily in a difficult financial situation due to an event beyond their control. School allowances are granted as cash benefits to cover education-related expenses or as education-related support in kind. The rules for granting maintenance-type benefits to pupils/students living in the territory of a commune (gmina) are adopted by the Commune Council, which is guided by the objectives of maintenance-type financial support.

Pupils/students with high educational or sporting achievements may be awarded a scholarship for learning or sporting achievements.

Students of schools for youth leading to the maturity certificate may be granted the Prime Minister’s scholarship. It is awarded to pupils/students who have been promoted to a higher grade with distinction, achieving the highest average mark in their school, or who have demonstrated special talents at least in one area of knowledge, achieving the highest results in this area and at least good results in other areas. The scholarship is awarded by the Prime Minister to one pupil/student per school for a period between September and June in a given school year.

The scholarship of the minister responsible for school education may be granted to a student in a public school for youth or a non-public school with the status of public school for youth who has demonstrated outstanding learning achievements, and in particular to:

  • the winner of an international competition, or the winner or a finalist in a national-level subject competition;
  • the winner of a research competition organized by a research institution or association;
  • an upper secondary school student with highest learning achievements who follows an individual study programme or learning path;
  • a school student taking classes at a higher education institution on the basis of academic regulations concerning the enrolment of particularly gifted school students on higher education programmes;
  • a pupil with high achievements in sporting competitions at national or international level.

The scholarship of the minister responsible for culture and national heritage may be awarded to a student in an arts school training for artistic occupations who:

  • has achieved a very high average mark in art subjects during a term (semester);
  • is the winner of an international or national arts competition.

Pupils/students who are not Polish nationals may be awarded a scholarship of the minister responsible for school education, the amount of which per month is equal to that of the Prime Minister’s scholarship.