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Poland:Initial Education for Teachers Working in Early Childhood and School Education

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Overview Poland

Contents

Poland:Political, Social and Economic Background and Trends

Poland:Historical Development

Poland:Main Executive and Legislative Bodies

Poland:Population: Demographic Situation, Languages and Religions

Poland:Political and Economic Situation

Poland:Organisation and Governance

Poland:Fundamental Principles and National Policies

Poland:Lifelong Learning Strategy

Poland:Organisation of the Education System and of its Structure

Poland:Organisation of Private Education

Poland:National Qualifications Framework

Poland:Administration and Governance at Central and/or Regional Level

Poland:Administration and Governance at Local and/or Institutional Level

Poland:Statistics on Organisation and Governance

Poland:Funding in Education

Poland:Early Childhood and School Education Funding

Poland:Higher Education Funding

Poland:Adult Education and Training Funding

Poland:Early Childhood Education and Care

Poland:Organisation of Programmes for Children under 2-3 years

Poland:Teaching and Learning in Programmes for Children under 2-3 years

Poland:Assessment in Programmes for Children under 2-3 years

Poland:Organisation of Programmes for Children over 2-3 years

Poland:Teaching and Learning in Programmes for Children over 2-3 years

Poland:Assessment in Programmes for Children over 2-3 years

Poland:Organisational Variations and Alternative Structures in Early Childhood Education and Care

Poland:Primary Education

Poland:Organisation of Primary Education

Poland:Teaching and Learning in Primary Education

Poland:Assessment in Primary Education

Poland:Organisational Variations and Alternative Structures in Primary Education

Poland:Secondary and Post-Secondary Non-Tertiary Education

Poland:Organisation of General Lower Secondary Education

Poland:Teaching and Learning in General Lower Secondary Education

Poland:Assessment in General Lower Secondary Education

Poland:Organisation of General Upper Secondary Education

Poland:Teaching and Learning in General Upper Secondary Education

Poland:Assessment in General Upper Secondary Education

Poland:Organisation of Vocational Upper Secondary Education

Poland:Teaching and Learning in Vocational Upper Secondary Education

Poland:Assessment in Vocational Upper Secondary Education

Poland:Organisation of Post-Secondary Non-Tertiary Education

Poland:Teaching and Learning in Post-Secondary Non-Tertiary Education

Poland:Assessment in Post-Secondary Non-Tertiary Education

Poland:Higher Education

Poland:Types of Higher Education Institutions

Poland:First Cycle Programmes

Poland:Bachelor

Poland:Short-Cycle Higher Education

Poland:Second Cycle Programmes

Poland:Programmes outside the Bachelor and Master Structure

Poland:Third Cycle (PhD) Programmes

Poland:Adult Education and Training

Poland:Distribution of Responsibilities

Poland:Developments and Current Policy Priorities

Poland:Main Providers

Poland:Main Types of Provision

Poland:Validation of Non-formal and Informal Learning

Poland:Teachers and Education Staff

Poland:Initial Education for Teachers Working in Early Childhood and School Education

Poland:Conditions of Service for Teachers Working in Early Childhood and School Education

Poland:Continuing Professional Development for Teachers Working in Early Childhood and School Education

Poland:Initial Education for Academic Staff in Higher Education

Poland:Conditions of Service for Academic Staff Working in Higher Education

Poland:Continuing Professional Development for Academic Staff Working in Higher Education

Poland:Initial Education for Teachers and Trainers Working in Adult Education and Training

Poland:Conditions of Service for Teachers and Trainers Working in Adult Education and Training

Poland:Continuing Professional Development for Teachers and Trainers Working in Adult Education and Training

Poland:Management and Other Education Staff

Poland:Management Staff for Early Childhood and School Education

Poland:Staff Involved in Monitoring Educational Quality for Early Childhood and School Education

Poland:Education Staff Responsible for Guidance in Early Childhood and School Education

Poland:Other Education Staff or Staff Working with Schools

Poland:Management Staff for Higher Education

Poland:Other Education Staff or Staff Working in Higher Education

Poland:Management Staff Working in Adult Education and Training

Poland:Other Education Staff or Staff Working in Adult Education and Training

Poland:Quality Assurance

Poland:Quality Assurance in Early Childhood and School Education

Poland:Quality Assurance in Higher Education

Poland:Quality Assurance in Adult Education and Training

Poland:Educational Support and Guidance

Poland:Special Education Needs Provision within Mainstream Education

Poland:Separate Special Education Needs Provision in Early Childhood and School Education

Poland:Support Measures for Learners in Early Childhood and School Education

Poland:Guidance and Counselling in Early Childhood and School Education

Poland:Support Measures for Learners in Higher Education

Poland:Guidance and Counselling in Higher Education

Poland:Support Measures for Learners in Adult Education and Training

Poland:Guidance and Counselling in a Lifelong Learning Approach

Poland:Mobility and Internationalisation

Poland:Mobility in Early Childhood and School Education

Poland:Mobility in Higher Education

Poland:Mobility in Adult Education and Training

Poland:Other Dimensions of Internationalisation in Early Childhood and School Education

Poland:Other Dimensions of Internationalisation in Higher Education

Poland:Other Dimensions of Internationalisation in Adult Education and Training

Poland:Bilateral Agreements and Worldwide Cooperation

Poland:Ongoing Reforms and Policy Developments

Poland:National Reforms in Early Childhood Education and Care

Poland:National Reforms in School Education

Poland:National Reforms in Vocational Education and Training and Adult Learning

Poland:National Reforms in Higher Education

Poland:National Reforms related to Transversal Skills and Employability

Poland:European Perspective

Poland:Legislation

Poland:Institutions

Poland:Glossary

As from 1 October 2016, initial teacher training in Poland is provided only within the higher education system.

Before this date, initial training of early childhood and school education teachers (hereafter referred to as ‘school education teachers’) was provided within two sectors of the education system: the higher education sector, and the school education sector. The latter included teacher training colleges (kolegium nauczycielskie) and foreign language teacher training colleges (nauczycielskie kolegium języków obcych) (so-called initial teacher training institutions) which operated from 1991 and were established, among other things, to facilitate the transition from teaching the Russian language to teaching the English language in the population boom period.

The decision to phase out colleges training teachers was explained by demographic changes and children of the population decline cohorts reaching the school entry age, which reduced the demand for newly trained teachers. With the higher education system having the capacity to train an adequate number of qualified teachers, there was no justification, according to the Ministry of National Education, for maintaining colleges.

30 September 2015 is the end date of the period of agreements concluded between bodies administering teacher training colleges and foreign language teacher training colleges on the one hand and higher education institutions on the other hand whereby college graduates could be awarded a Bachelor’s degree.

Most of the colleges ceased enrolling students in the academic year 2012/2013. All colleges have been be liquidated as of 1 October 2016.

The higher education sector provides several types of programmes for the initial training of teachers:

  • degree programmes, including:
    • first-cycle programmes (leading to a Bachelor's degree /licencjat or inżynier, depending on the field of study/ or an equivalent degree);
    • second-cycle programmes (leading to a Master's degree /magister/ or an equivalent degree);
    • long-cycle programmes (like second-cycle programmes, leading to a Master's degree /magister/ or an equivalent degree);
  • non-degree postgraduate programmes (leading to a certificate of completion of a non-degree postgraduate programme).

These programmes are offered by both university-type and non-university higher education institutions (HEIs). Both types of HEIs operate in both the public and non-public higher education sectors.

At present, teachers who hold a higher education diploma (a Bachelor’s or Master’s degree) represent 98% of all teachers working in the school education sector.

Institutions, level and models of training

The concurrent model of teacher training is predominating in Poland. It is followed mainly in pedagogical higher education institutions (HEIs), but also in all types of other HEIs. As part of degree programmes in individual fields of study at HEIs, students may choose a teacher specialisation track, which means that they can complete professional teacher training (and acquire a teaching / pedagogical/ qualification) as part of their degree programmes, in parallel to their subject-specific training.

Those who have not taken a teacher specialisation track and choose the teaching profession later may obtain a teaching qualification upon completion of a non-degree postgraduate programme or a qualification course. This option represents the consecutive model of teacher training.

HEIs train teachers for all levels of the school education system, including nursery, primary, lower and upper secondary and post-secondary schools, as part of degree programmes (first-, second- and long-cycle programmes) and non-degree postgraduate programmes.

Initial teacher training provided as part of first-cycle (Bachelor’s degree) programmes prepares future teachers to work only in nursery schools (ISCED 0) and primary schools (ISCED 1).

Those who complete teacher training as part of second-cycle and long-cycle (Master’s degree) programmes are qualified to work in all types of schools and other educational institutions. Teachers working in lower secondary schools (ISCED 2) and schools above the lower secondary education level (ISCED 3) are required to hold a Master’s degree.

Non-degree postgraduate programmes are intended for those who hold at least a Bachelor’s degree and intend to:

  • obtain a qualification to teach another subject (while already being qualified teachers);
  • acquire a teaching qualification by completing professional/pedagogical initial teacher training (while already holding a degree in a given subject area); or
  • complete training in special education (while already being fully qualified teachers).

The following HEIs train teachers to work in the school education system:

  • Universities and pedagogical HEIs train teachers of various specialisations for schools at all levels. They mainly train the following categories of teachers: teachers of general education subjects for primary, lower secondary, upper secondary and post-secondary schools; pre-school education and early school education teachers; teachers and tutors for educational and childcare establishments, counselling and guidance services, i.e. psychological and educational support services (and other specialist units providing support to children and youth), as well as school libraries and educational resources centres.

One of the pedagogical HEIs is the Maria Grzegorzewska Academy of Special Education in Warsaw which trains teachers for special schools and establishments for children and youth with special educational needs (SEN) at various levels. It is the only HEI that provides programmes in the field of special education with all relevant specialisation tracks.

There are also other research and educational institutions or units (institutes, chairs, departments) working in the field of special education and training of teachers for special education.

  • Physical education HEIs train physical education teachers and those who provide remedial and compensatory activities for schools and other educational institutions of all types and at all education levels.
  • Technical universities and other HEIs specialised in engineering and technology train vocational subject teachers for upper secondary and post-secondary schools, teachers teaching technical skills and, on a limited scale, teachers of general subjects such as mathematics and natural sciences for schools of all levels and types.
  • Art HEIs train teachers of visual arts and music for schools of various levels and types.
  • HEIs specialised in economics, agriculture and medicine train vocational subject teachers for upper secondary and post-secondary schools.

Admission requirements

Admission to first-cycle and long-cycle programmes is based on results of the maturity exam (taken at the end of upper secondary education, except in basic vocational schools).

The senate of a higher education institution (HEI) decides which results of the maturity exam provide a basis for admission.

Admission rules and procedures in HEIs are determined by their senates.

Where admission in a given field of study is free, enrolment decisions are taken by the head of the relevant organisational unit of an HEI (e.g. the dean of a faculty).

In case admission is not free, student enrolment is carried out by an admissions committee established by the head of a given basic organisational unit or other body specified in the statutes of an HEI.

HEIs may conduct additional entrance examinations only when it is necessary to assess artistic abilities, physical fitness or special predispositions to take up study in a given field which are not assessed as part of the maturity exam, or when an applicant holds a maturity certificate obtained abroad. Additionally, as an exception, HEIs may conduct entrance exams for applicants who hold a certificate obtained upon passing the maturity exam before 2005 (when the maturity exam was an internal school exam, not a national one as it is now).

Second-cycle programmes are open to applicants who hold at least a first-cycle qualification (a Bachelor’s degree).

Individual HEIs lay down their own admission requirements, specifying the fields of study which may be represented by those applying for admission to a second-cycle programme in a given field of study.

Where applicants have a Bachelor’s degree in the same or related field of study, admission is based on the rankings of average grades for first-cycle programmes; if the average grade is the same, the final score (based on the average grade, and the grades for the final thesis and the final exam) given on the diploma is decisive.

Where the field of study of the second-cycle programme does not correspond with that of the first-cycle programme, students take exams or complete additional courses.

Non-degree postgraduate programmes may be taken by individuals who have at least a Bachelor’s degree.

Curriculum, level of specialisation and learning outcomes

Higher education institutions (HEIs) train teachers as part of:

  • first-cycle programmes (leading to a Bachelor’s degree: licencjat or inżynier),
  • second-cycle programmes (leading to a Master’s degree: magister),
  • long-cycle programmes (leading to a Master’s degree: magister),
  • non-degree postgraduate programmes.

Programmes in HEIs are offered as:

  • full-time programmes: where at least half of the curriculum includes classes requiring direct participation of academic teachers and students;
  • part-time programmes: a mode/form of study other than full-time programmes, as specified by the senate of an HEI.

Part-time programmes lead to the same learning outcomes as full-time programmes but may be one or two semesters longer.

Initial training of teachers as part of degree programmes in HEIs is mostly provided within fields of study for prospective professionals working in various sectors (e.g. programmes in the field of chemistry train professionals who work in industrial enterprises, research institutes and laboratories, as well as teachers of chemistry).

Within a given field of study, students may either choose a teaching specialisation track and acquire a teaching (pedagogical) qualification as part of their degree programme or complete a degree programme without a teaching specialisation and acquire a teaching qualification upon completion of a non-degree postgraduate programme offered in an HEI or a teaching qualification course in an accredited in-service teacher training institution.

Until recently, HEIs mainly trained teachers in one specialisation area (one subject). However, in recent years, following the adoption of standards (programme requirements) for initial teacher training, they have also started introducing programmes which cover two specialisation areas (two subjects). These usually combine related specialisation areas (e.g. pre-school and early school education, mathematics and computer science or physics, chemistry and biology or physics, biology and environmental protection, etc.).

Teachers may also be trained to teach a second subject as part of non-degree postgraduate programmes.

First-cycle programmes leading to a licencjat degree (one of the two types of Bachelor’s degrees which are awarded depending on the field of study) last at least 3 years (at least 180 ECTS credits). First-cycle programmes leading to an inżynier degree last at least 3.5 years (at least 210 ECTS credits).

The duration of second-cycle (Master’s degree) programmes ranges from 1.5 to 2 years (90 to 120 ECTS credits).

Long-cycle (Master’s degree) programmes last from 4.5 to 6 years (300 to 360 ECTS credits), with programmes in the fields normally chosen by future teachers ranging from 4.5 to 5 years.

Non-degree postgraduate programmes last at least one year (two semesters), and the study programme should enable students to obtain at least 60 ECTS credits.

HEIs are free to develop curricula within their autonomy, but they are obliged to fulfil certain requirements laid down in the national legislation.

Initial teacher training as part of both degree and non-degree postgraduate programmes (like degree programmes for the regulated professions) should comply with national standards laid down in the above-mentioned Regulation of the Minister of Science and Higher Education of 17 January 2012.

The above-mentioned types of degree programmes and non-degree postgraduate programmes for initial teacher training are structured according to the following modules :

  • Module 1: Subject-specific courses for the teaching of the first subject (type of classes);
  • Module 2: Psychology and pedagogy (education) courses;
  • Module 3: Teaching courses;
  • Module 4: Training for the teaching of an additional subject (type of classes);
  • Module 5: Special pedagogy / special education course.

Initial teacher training as part of degree and non-degree postgraduate programmes includes compulsory training in:

  • the first subject / type of classes to be taught: Module 1;
  • psychology and pedagogy: Module 2;
  • teaching methodology: Module 3.

Initial teacher training as part of degree programmes may be extended to include training in:

  • the second subject / type of classes to be taught: Module 4;
  • special pedagogy / special education: Module 5.

Initial teacher training as part of non-degree postgraduate programmes may include:

  • training for the teaching of another subject (types of classes): Module 4;
  • training in psychology and pedagogy and in teaching methodology for graduates who have a qualification to teach a given a subject (type of classes) but have not completed training in psychology and pedagogy and teaching methodology: Modules 2 and 3; however, in the case of first-cycle programme graduates, this type of training prepares only for teaching in nursery schools and primary schools;
  • a special pedagogy / special education course for those who have a teaching qualification: Module 5.

The standards do not define the number of hours or ECTS credits for Module 1 because these depend on the field and level of study.

Module 2 (psychology and pedagogy /education/ courses) comprises the following compulsory components, with a total duration of 180 hours and 10 ECTS credits: general psychology and education / pedagogy training (90 hours), training in psychology for (a) given education stage(s) (60 hours), and a practical placement (30 hours).

Module 3 (teaching courses) comprises fundamentals of teaching (30 hours), subject-specific (class-specific) teaching for (a) given education stage(s) (90 hours), and a practical placement (120 hours), with a total module duration of 240 hours and 15 ECTS credits.

Module 4 (training for the teaching of an additional subject) includes subject-specific training (the number of hours not predefined), subject-specific teaching for (a) given education stage(s) (60 hours) and a practical placement (60 hours); in total (except for subject-specific training), 120 hours, 10-15 ECTS credits.

Module 5 (special pedagogy / special education) comprises special psychology and pedagogy / education courses (140 hours), teaching methods for special education (90 hours) and a practical placement (120 hours); in total 350 hours and 25 ECTS credits.

Additionally, the standards include a general description of the modules, specify their contents (with regard to the levels of the education system), and define the aims of student practical placements undertaken as part of Modules 2 to 5.

Practical placements / internships should be undertaken mainly in parallel with regular classes taught at HEIs and comprise the following activities: visits to nursery schools, schools and other educational institutions; class observation; assisting teachers conducting classes; teaching classes; and planning and discussing classes taught by others (teachers and students).

The standards define the same general and detailed learning outcomes for initial teacher training as part of degree programmes and non-degree postgraduate programmes.

Detailed learning outcomes refer to the knowledge, skills and social competences, and to the knowledge of a foreign language, knowledge and skills in ICT, voice production, and knowledge of safety and hygiene at work.

Upon completion of initial teacher training, graduates:

  • have knowledge of psychology and pedagogy which enables them to understand processes of development, socialisation, education, and teaching and learning;
  • have knowledge of teaching and detailed teaching methodology, supported by experience of using it in practice;
  • have skills and competences necessary to perform complex teaching, education and care tasks assigned to the school, including the development and adaptation of curricula to the needs and abilities of pupils/students;
  • demonstrate the ability to learn and improve their own pedagogical techniques and methods, while using modern means and methods of searching for, organising and processing, information and materials;
  • communicate successfully through various techniques with both people who are subjects of a teaching activity and other people contributing to the education process and specialists supporting this process;
  • demonstrate ethical sensitivity, empathy, openness, ability to reflect and pro-social attitudes and a sense of responsibility;
  • are prepared in practical terms to perform professional (educational, teaching and care-related) tasks which are part of a teacher’s role.

Teacher educators

Teachers are trained in higher education institutions (HEIs) by academic teachers who are divided into research-and-teaching staff, research staff and teaching staff, and qualified librarians and qualified scientific documentation and information staff (see the chapter on ‘Academic Teachers’). Only research-and-teaching staff and teaching staff are statutorily obliged to train students.

The legislation does not lay down any special requirements for academic staff who train teachers. General requirements for research-and-teaching, research and teaching staff concerning the level of qualifications, including academic degrees and titles, are defined by law. The statutes of an HEI can define additional requirements and professional qualifications to be held by academic teachers.

Teachers in in-service teacher training institutions are considered school education teachers in the national legislation and are subject to separate regulations.

Teaching positions in in-service teacher training institutions may be taken by those who have completed teacher training (have a teaching qualification) and a Master’s degree in the field of study (specialisation area) which corresponds to the subject / course taught or in the field where the study programme covers the contents of the subject / course taught. An alternative combination is a Master’s degree in a different field of study and a non-degree postgraduate programme completed in the area covering the subject or type of classes to be taught.

Teachers employed in in-service teacher training institutions as methodological advisers are required to have the grade of appointed or chartered teacher (the third and fourth grades in the professional promotion system for school education teachers) and at least 5-year teaching experience.

Qualifications, evaluation and certificates

Qualifications

Teachers are required to hold a qualification (degree or diploma) at a relevant level and to have completed teacher training (as part of a degree or non-degree postgraduate programme or a qualification course).

The level of the qualification required depends on the level of the school education system at which teachers intend to teach:

  • Pre-school education: a Bachelor’s degree or a Master’s degree;
  • Primary education (so-called education stage I: Grades I to III; education stage II: Grades IV to VI): a Bachelor’s degree or a Master’s degree;
  • Lower-secondary education (education stage III): a Master's degree;
  • Upper-secondary and post-secondary education (education stage IV): a Master's degree.

Special and integration school teachers are required to hold a qualification at a relevant level (to have completed a required level of education) and qualifications relevant to the type of disability.

Rehabilitation classes in special and residential schools are conducted by teachers who have completed a relevant special education specialisation as part of a degree programme, a relevant qualification course or a non-degree postgraduate programme.

Qualification requirements for teachers are laid down in the Regulation of the Minister of National Education of 12 March 2009 on the detailed qualification requirements for teachers, and on schools and cases in which teachers without a higher education qualification or a diploma of a teacher training institution may be employed (as subsequently amended; last amended on 17 April 2012).

Assessment and diplomas

Student performance during a course of study in an HEI is assessed by academic teachers on the basis of coursework, tests and examinations.

Academic teachers apply various methods to assess student achievements (oral examinations, written examinations, tests, etc.). It is normally a numerical mark or credit that is recorded in the student book (academic transcript). HEIs use a four-grade scale (very good, fair, satisfactory and unsatisfactory).

Students following first-cycle (Bachelor’s degree) programmes are required to write a final (diploma) thesis and take the final (diploma) examination.

In order to complete a programme, students should achieve intended learning outcomes and obtain a certain number of ECTS credits as specified in the study programme (see the section ‘Curriculum, level of specialisation and learning outcomes’).

Graduates are awarded a higher education diploma which includes details such as: the mode, level, field of study and, where applicable, specialisation area (e.g. teaching specialisation), academic area and programme orientation/’profile’, and the type of Bachelor’s degree obtained: licencjat or inżynier or an equivalent degree.

Together with a diploma, graduates receive a Diploma Supplement, based on the model developed by the European Commission, the Council of Europe and UNESCO/CEPES. It includes, among other things, information about the diploma itself, the level of the qualification obtained, contents of the programme completed and results achieved (together with ECTS credits and the final grade), and the function of the qualification.

Students following second-cycle and long-cycle (Master’s degree) programmes are required to write a final (diploma) thesis and take the final (diploma) examination.

Although a Master's degree is formally defined as a 'professional title', theses are in most cases research-based papers.

In order to complete a programme, students should achieve the learning outcomes and obtain a certain number of ECTS credits as specified in the study programme (see the section ‘Curriculum, level of specialisation and learning outcomes’).

Graduates are awarded a higher education diploma which includes details such as: the mode, level, field of study and, where applicable, specialisation area (e.g. teaching specialisation), academic area and programme orientation, and the type of Master’s degree obtained: magister, magister inżynier or magister sztuki or an equivalent degree.

Those completing both types of Master’s degree programmes receive a Diploma Supplement.

In order to complete a non-degree postgraduate programme, students are required to achieve intended learning outcomes, obtain at least 60 ECTS credits, pass examinations, and submit a final thesis or pass the final exam where these are included in the study programme.

Graduates are awarded a certificate of completion of a non-degree postgraduate programme. It includes, among other things, information about the scope of the programme, the number of semesters, the final grade and a list of theoretical and practical training classes together with the corresponding number of ECTS credits.

There are no specific ‘teaching qualifications’ as such awarded in higher education. Higher education diplomas for degree programmes with a teaching specialisation track, and certificates of completion of non-degree postgraduate programmes preparing for the teaching profession confirm the completion of teacher training, and thus are recognised as a ‘teaching qualification’.

Alternative training pathways

Alternative training pathways are available to prospective foreign language teachers and practical vocational training teachers.

Qualifications for teaching foreign languages

Teachers teaching foreign languages in nursery schools and schools are required to hold:

  • a second- or long-cycle (Master’s degree) programme in the field of Philology or Applied Linguistics, with the specialisation track corresponding to the language to be taught, and a teaching qualification;
  • a degree programme in the country where a given foreign language taught in a college is an / the official language, and a teaching qualification;
  • a first-cycle (Bachelor’s) programme in the field of Philology, with the specialisation track corresponding to the language to be taught, and a teaching qualification;
  • a first-cycle (Bachelor’s) programme in the specialisation track corresponding to the language to be taught or in the field of Applied Linguistics, with the specialisation track corresponding to the language to be taught, and a teaching qualification;
  • a foreign language teacher training college, with the specialisation track corresponding to the language to be taught;
  • a degree programme in any field of study / specialisation track, and a certificate awarded upon passing a state 2nd degree examination in a foreign language for teachers (as referred to in the Annex to the above-mentioned Regulation);
  • a degree programme in any field of study / specialisation track, and a certificate of language skills at advanced or proficient level (as referred to in the Annex to the above-mentioned Regulation), and a teaching qualification.

Qualifications for practical vocational training

Practical vocational training in basic vocational schools, technical upper secondary schools, supplementary technical upper secondary schools and post-secondary schools, including in youth detention centres and young offenders’ centres, may also be provided by individuals who:

  • have a maturity certificate, a document confirming vocational qualifications in the occupation for which they intend to train pupils/students, a teaching qualification, and at least 2-year experience in the occupation for which they intend to train pupils/students;
  • hold the title of Master Craftsman in the occupation for which they intend to train pupils/students, and a teaching qualification.