This page was last modified on 26 March 2017, at 21:17.

Czech-Republic:Second Cycle Programmes

From Eurydice

Jump to: navigation, search

Overview Czech Republic

Contents

Czech-Republic:Political, Social and Economic Background and Trends

Czech-Republic:Historical Development

Czech-Republic:Main Executive and Legislative Bodies

Czech-Republic:Population: Demographic Situation, Languages and Religions

Czech-Republic:Political and Economic Situation

Czech-Republic:Organisation and Governance

Czech-Republic:Fundamental Principles and National Policies

Czech-Republic:Lifelong Learning Strategy

Czech-Republic:Organisation of the Education System and of its Structure

Czech-Republic:Organisation of Private Education

Czech-Republic:National Qualifications Framework

Czech-Republic:Administration and Governance at Central and/or Regional Level

Czech-Republic:Administration and Governance at Local and/or Institutional Level

Czech-Republic:Statistics on Organisation and Governance

Czech-Republic:Funding in Education

Czech-Republic:Early Childhood and School Education Funding

Czech-Republic:Higher Education Funding

Czech-Republic:Adult Education and Training Funding

Czech-Republic:Early Childhood Education and Care

Czech-Republic:Organisation of Programmes for Children under 2-3 years

Czech-Republic:Teaching and Learning in Programmes for Children under 2-3 years

Czech-Republic:Assessment in Programmes for Children under 2-3 years

Czech-Republic:Organisation of Programmes for Children over 2-3 years

Czech-Republic:Teaching and Learning in Programmes for Children over 2-3 years

Czech-Republic:Assessment in Programmes for Children over 2-3 years

Czech-Republic:Organisational Variations and Alternative Structures in Early Childhood Education and Care

Czech-Republic:Single Structure Education (Integrated Primary and Lower Secondary Education)

Czech-Republic:Organisation of Single Structure Education

Czech-Republic:Teaching and Learning in Single Structure Education

Czech-Republic:Assessment in Single Structure Education

Czech-Republic:Organisational Variations and Alternative Structures in Single Structure Education

Czech-Republic:Upper Secondary and Post-Secondary Non-Tertiary Education

Czech-Republic:Organisation of Upper Secondary Education

Czech-Republic:Teaching and Learning in Upper Secondary Education

Czech-Republic:Assessment in Upper Secondary Education

Czech-Republic:Organisation of Conservatoires (Arts Education)

Czech-Republic:Teaching and Learning in Conservatoires (Arts Education)

Czech-Republic:Assessment in Conservatoires (Arts Education)

Czech-Republic:Organisation of Follow-up and Shortened Study

Czech-Republic:Teaching and Learning in Follow-up and Shortened Study

Czech-Republic:Assessment in Follow-up and Shortened Study

Czech-Republic:Higher Education

Czech-Republic:Types of Higher Education Institutions

Czech-Republic:First Cycle Programmes

Czech-Republic:Bachelor

Czech-Republic:Short-Cycle Higher Education

Czech-Republic:Second Cycle Programmes

Czech-Republic:Programmes outside the Bachelor and Master Structure

Czech-Republic:Third Cycle (PhD) Programmes

Czech-Republic:Adult Education and Training

Czech-Republic:Distribution of Responsibilities

Czech-Republic:Developments and Current Policy Priorities

Czech-Republic:Main Providers

Czech-Republic:Main Types of Provision

Czech-Republic:Validation of Non-formal and Informal Learning

Czech-Republic:Teachers and Education Staff

Czech-Republic:Initial Education for Teachers Working in Early Childhood and School Education

Czech-Republic:Conditions of Service for Teachers Working in Early Childhood and School Education

Czech-Republic:Continuing Professional Development for Teachers Working in Early Childhood and School Education

Czech-Republic:Initial Education for Academic Staff in Higher Education

Czech-Republic:Conditions of Service for Academic Staff Working in Higher Education

Czech-Republic:Continuing Professional Development for Academic Staff Working in Higher Education

Czech-Republic:Initial Education for Teachers and Trainers Working in Adult Education and Training

Czech-Republic:Conditions of Service for Teachers and Trainers Working in Adult Education and Training

Czech-Republic:Continuing Professional Development for Teachers and Trainers Working in Adult Education and Training

Czech-Republic:Management and Other Education Staff

Czech-Republic:Management Staff for Early Childhood and School Education

Czech-Republic:Staff Involved in Monitoring Educational Quality for Early Childhood and School Education

Czech-Republic:Education Staff Responsible for Guidance in Early Childhood and School Education

Czech-Republic:Other Education Staff or Staff Working with Schools

Czech-Republic:Management Staff for Higher Education

Czech-Republic:Other Education Staff or Staff Working in Higher Education

Czech-Republic:Management Staff Working in Adult Education and Training

Czech-Republic:Other Education Staff or Staff Working in Adult Education and Training

Czech-Republic:Quality Assurance

Czech-Republic:Quality Assurance in Early Childhood and School Education

Czech-Republic:Quality Assurance in Higher Education

Czech-Republic:Quality Assurance in Adult Education and Training

Czech-Republic:Educational Support and Guidance

Czech-Republic:Special Education Needs Provision within Mainstream Education

Czech-Republic:Separate Special Education Needs Provision in Early Childhood and School Education

Czech-Republic:Support Measures for Learners in Early Childhood and School Education

Czech-Republic:Guidance and Counselling in Early Childhood and School Education

Czech-Republic:Support Measures for Learners in Higher Education

Czech-Republic:Guidance and Counselling in Higher Education

Czech-Republic:Support Measures for Learners in Adult Education and Training

Czech-Republic:Guidance and Counselling in a Lifelong Learning Approach

Czech-Republic:Mobility and Internationalisation

Czech-Republic:Mobility in Early Childhood and School Education

Czech-Republic:Mobility in Higher Education

Czech-Republic:Mobility in Adult Education and Training

Czech-Republic:Other Dimensions of Internationalisation in Early Childhood and School Education

Czech-Republic:Other Dimensions of Internationalisation in Higher Education

Czech-Republic:Other Dimensions of Internationalisation in Adult Education and Training

Czech-Republic:Bilateral Agreements and Worldwide Cooperation

Czech-Republic:Ongoing Reforms and Policy Developments

Czech-Republic:National Reforms in Early Childhood Education and Care

Czech-Republic:National Reforms in School Education

Czech-Republic:National Reforms in Vocational Education and Training and Adult Learning

Czech-Republic:National Reforms in Higher Education

Czech-Republic:National Reforms related to Transversal Skills and Employability

Czech-Republic:European Perspective

Czech-Republic:Legislation

Czech-Republic:Institutions

Czech-Republic:Bibliography

Czech-Republic:Glossary

Study Programmes

Master’s degree programmes are intended to promote the acquisition of theoretical knowledge based on current scientific and scholarly knowledge, research and development and to lead students to apply this knowledge and develop their creative facilities. In the area of fine arts, they are designed to provide demanding artistic training and encourage the development of students’ talents.

Master’s degree programmes follow on from Bachelor’s degree programmes (ISCED 747); the standard length of such a programme is no less than one and no more than three years. One standard academic year corresponds to 60 ETCS credits. Most Master’s degree programmes last two years (120 ECTS).

Most higher education institutions (vysoké školy) have already implemented the three-cycle study structure, thus Master’s degree programmes are accredited as a follow up to Bachelor’s degree programmes with the exception of a traditional non-structured Master‘s programme (ISCED 746) used only when the nature of the study requires it. In such a case, the standard length of study is no less than four and no more than six years (usually five years, six years int he case of general medicine). Within the non-structured Master´s programmes especially the study of medicine, law, primary teacher training, etc is carried out. These non-structured ”long“ Master’s degree programmes are included in Programmes Outside the Bachelor and Master Structure.

Creation and offer of degree programmes belong to recognised academic rights and freedoms of higher education institutions (see the chapter Administration and Governance at Local /or Institutional Level). Study programme is subject to accreditation, which is awarded by the National Accreditation Bureau for Higher Education (Accreditation Bureau) or is approved in an internal process by the higher education institution itself. This is the case when the higher education institutions obtains an institutional accreditation for particular educational area/areas. Study programmes approved by the higher education institution are considered as accredited according to the Higher Education Act. Newly, the programmes are not broken down into study fields. For more information see part Bachelor, Branches of Study. 

Degree programmes can take forms of on-site courses, distance learning courses or a combination of both. The combined form is common; the distance-learning form is accredited only at two higher education institutions in three fields (for more, see the chapter First cycle programmes, the section Bachelor, Branches of Study).


Legislation and Bibliography:

Higher Education Act



Admission Requirements

Successful completion of any programme, i.e. especially of a Bachelor‘s degree programme (ISCED 645) but also Master´s degree programme including the non-structured one (ISCED 747 or 746) as well as doctoral degree programme (ISCED 844) is the condition for admission to a Master‘s degree programme following on from a Bachelor’s degree programme. In some cases, though, a higher education institution (vysoká škola) may also set further conditions relating to particular study fields or a number of credits gained in certain subjects, e.g. a higher education institution can lay down a duty on students to pass some basic subjects that they had not passed in their previous study in the Bachelor’s programme.

Admission may be subject only to the applicants’ meeting of the predefined requirements.

An entrance examination can be part of an admission proceeding to a Master’s degree programme. The content and the form of the examination are entirely upon the responsibility of the relevant higher education institution.

Restrictions in the number of students and the admission process are similar to the Bachelor’s programme. The general principles are the same. (See Admission Requirements in the section Bachelor’s.)

For information on tuition fees and other payments, see the section Fees within Public Higher Education in the chapter Funding in Education.


Legislation and Bibliography:

Higher Education Act


 


Curriculum

General principles are the same as for Bachelor’s degree programmes (see the part First Cycle Programmes, the section Curriculum).

In the Government regulation on the accreditation standards in higher education, it is explicitly stated for the content of education in Master’s degree programmes:

The content of a Master’s degree programme is based on the contemporary state of scientific knowledge and creative activitiy in the particular educational area.


Legislation and Bibliography:

Higher Education Act

Government Regulation on the Accreditation Standards in Higher Education



Teaching Methods

General principles are the same as for Bachelor’s degree programmes (see the part First Cycle Programmes, the section Teaching Methods).



Progression of Students

General principles are the same as for a Bachelor’s degree programme (see the part First Cycle Programmes, the section Progression of Students). Further conditions are included in Study and Examination Regulations of higher education institutions (vysoké školy) or faculties. A maximum period of study is embedded in internal regulations of higher education institutions (at Charles University, it is the standard length plus 3 years).



Employability

HEIs are highly autonomous in setting the content of their courses. In the case of professionally oriented Master’s study programmes, the higher education institutions are required to manifest cooperation with practice and the study programme is drawn up to enable the students to manage practical skills needed for the profession. The study plan of the professionally oriented programme shall include practice in the length of at least 6 weeks. The non-structured version of professionally oriented Master’s study programmes (see section Master’s non/structured study programmes) shall include practice of at least 18 weeks. (Government Regulation on the Accreditation Standards in Higher Education).

The Government is not allowed to oblige HEIs to include certain forms of education in their programmes but it can support them namely by financial incentives. 

The general principles are the same as for a Bachelor’s degree programme (see the part First Cycle Programmes, the section Employability and the chapter Educational Support and Guidance, the part on Guidance and Counselling in Higher Education). The database of the Education Policy Centre, Charles University in Prague (SVP PedF UK) mentioned enables to determine what percentage of graduates follows on to Doctoral programmes and what the employability of graduates is. The following data cover Master’s programme graduates of all Master’s degree programmes including Master’s non-structured degree programmes.


Unemployment rate of Master’s study graduates of all public higher education institutions (vysoké školy) in the Czech Republic, 2002–2016 (data collection in April of the given year)


2002
2003
2004
2005 2006 2007
2008 2009
2010 2011
2012
2013
2014
2015 2016
0–12 months
9,4
10,3 8,2
5,5
4,5
3,4
2,9 3,5
5,5
6,2
4,2
6,4
6,1
5,4 4,5
12–24 months
5,0
5,0
4,5
2,1
1,6
1,3
1,1
1,6 1,7 1,7
1,2 1,7
1,7
1,7 1,7

Source: Database of the SVP PedF UK - data extracted on 1 August 2016


Legislation and Bibliography: 

Higher Education Act 

Communication of the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports (SK23/2015) of 11. 8. 2015, issuing the list of regulated professions in the Czech Republic (2015)

Communication of the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports (SK27/2011), issuing the list of regulated professions in the Czech Republic (2011)

Directive 2005/36/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council on the Recognition of Professional Qualifications

Strategic Plan for the Scholarly, Scientific, Research, Development, Innovation, Artistic and Other Creative Activities of Higher Education Institutions (2016–2020)

Student Assessment

General principles are the same as for a Bachelor’s degree programmes (see the part First Cycle Programmes, the section Student Assessment). Further conditions are included in Study and Examination Regulations of higher education institutions (vysoké školy) or faculties. The diploma thesis (diplomová práce) is part of the final state examination (státní závěrečná zkouška).


Legislation and Bibliography:

Higher Education Act



Certification

A Master’s degree programme finishes with a final state examination (státní závěrečná zkouška); the defence of a thesis is its part. Studies are considered to be completed on the day when the corresponding state examination or its last part was taken.

A higher education diploma (vysokoškolský diplom) and a supplement to the diploma (dodatek k diplomu) are documents confirming completion of studies and the right to use the appropriate academic title. The level of education attained is ISCED 747.

Higher education institutions (vysoké školy) have the right to award a higher education qualification (diploma) only in accredited study programmes. Accreditation is awarded to the particular higher education institution by the National Accreditation Bureau for Higher Education (Accreditation Bureau) either in a form of an institutional accreditation for an educational area or in the form of an accreditation for a particular study programme. On the basis of an institutional accreditation for an educational area the higher education institution gains a permission to approve its study programmes within the given area itself. For more information see part External Evaluation of Higher Education Institutions.  


An Overview of Academic Titles in Master’s Study Programmes

Programmes
Title
Abbreviation
in economy, technical sciences and technology, agriculture, forestry and military
inženýr (Engineer) 
Ing.
in architecture 
inženýr architekt (Engineer of Architecture) 
Ing. arch.
in art1)
magistr umění (Master of Art)
MgA.
in other fields (except for medicine, veterinary or hygiene) 
magistr (Master)
Mgr.

Note: Academic titles are used in front of the name.

1) For graduates of Bachelor’s and Master’s programmes in arts who were admitted without having completed upper secondary education with a school-leaving examination (střední vzdělání s maturitní zkouškou) or tertiary professional education (vyšší odborné vzdělání), the title is awarded after they have achieved this.


Successful completion of the Master's degree programme is a prerequisite for admission to a doctoral programme; their graduates obtain the title Ph.D. (for more, see the chapter Third Cycle (PhD) Programmes).


Advanced Study Examination (státní rigorózní zkouška)

Apart from this, after being awarded the titlemagistr, graduates of a Master's degree programme can sit for an advanced study examination (státní rigorózní zkouška) in the same field. This includes the defence of an advanced study thesis. The title awarded is Doctor in the respective field, so-called “small doctorate” (rigorózum) (Advanced Master Degree). The level of education attained is ISCED 740. Upon completion of the advanced study examination, the higher education institution issues a diploma with indication of the particular higher education institution and the awarded academic title. The higher education institution can set a fee for activities connected with the submission of the application for the examination and the organisation of the examination. Within the accreditation of the Master´s degree programme by the Accreditation Bureau, it is also decided upon the permission of awarding these academic titles. In case of institutional accreditation, such possibility arises from the institutional accreditation for the given educational area. The higher education institution can award such academic titles only if it has the permission for the given educational area to realize at least one Doctoral degree programme.  In terms of qualification level, Advanced Master Degree is a Master level qualification. Conditions of an advanced master proceeding are usually regulated by the internal regulation of the particular higher education institution. .


An Overview of Academic Titles Advanced Study Examination

Advanced study examination
Title
Abbreviation
in law
doktor práv (Doctor of Law)
JUDr.
in humanities, education and social sciences
doktor filozofie (Doctor of Philosophy)
PhDr.
in sciences
doktor přírodních věd (Doctor of Natural Sciences)
RNDr.
in pharmacy
doktor farmacie (Doctor of Pharmacy)
PharmDr.
in theology
doktor teologie (Doctor of Theology) or licenciát teologie (Licentiate of Theology)
ThDr. of ThLic.

Note: Academic titles are used in front of the name.


For more information on recognition of foreign higher education qualifications, the part First Cycle Programmes, the section Certification.

 

Legislation and Bibliography:

Higher Education Act