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Czech-Republic:Organisation of Conservatoires (Arts Education)

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Overview Czech Republic

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Czech-Republic:Political, Social and Economic Background and Trends

Czech-Republic:Historical Development

Czech-Republic:Main Executive and Legislative Bodies

Czech-Republic:Population: Demographic Situation, Languages and Religions

Czech-Republic:Political and Economic Situation

Czech-Republic:Organisation and Governance

Czech-Republic:Fundamental Principles and National Policies

Czech-Republic:Lifelong Learning Strategy

Czech-Republic:Organisation of the Education System and of its Structure

Czech-Republic:Organisation of Private Education

Czech-Republic:National Qualifications Framework

Czech-Republic:Administration and Governance at Central and/or Regional Level

Czech-Republic:Administration and Governance at Local and/or Institutional Level

Czech-Republic:Statistics on Organisation and Governance

Czech-Republic:Funding in Education

Czech-Republic:Early Childhood and School Education Funding

Czech-Republic:Higher Education Funding

Czech-Republic:Adult Education and Training Funding

Czech-Republic:Early Childhood Education and Care

Czech-Republic:Organisation of Programmes for Children under 2-3 years

Czech-Republic:Teaching and Learning in Programmes for Children under 2-3 years

Czech-Republic:Assessment in Programmes for Children under 2-3 years

Czech-Republic:Organisation of Programmes for Children over 2-3 years

Czech-Republic:Teaching and Learning in Programmes for Children over 2-3 years

Czech-Republic:Assessment in Programmes for Children over 2-3 years

Czech-Republic:Organisational Variations and Alternative Structures in Early Childhood Education and Care

Czech-Republic:Single Structure Education (Integrated Primary and Lower Secondary Education)

Czech-Republic:Organisation of Single Structure Education

Czech-Republic:Teaching and Learning in Single Structure Education

Czech-Republic:Assessment in Single Structure Education

Czech-Republic:Organisational Variations and Alternative Structures in Single Structure Education

Czech-Republic:Upper Secondary and Post-Secondary Non-Tertiary Education

Czech-Republic:Organisation of Upper Secondary Education

Czech-Republic:Teaching and Learning in Upper Secondary Education

Czech-Republic:Assessment in Upper Secondary Education

Czech-Republic:Organisation of Conservatoires (Arts Education)

Czech-Republic:Teaching and Learning in Conservatoires (Arts Education)

Czech-Republic:Assessment in Conservatoires (Arts Education)

Czech-Republic:Organisation of Follow-up and Shortened Study

Czech-Republic:Teaching and Learning in Follow-up and Shortened Study

Czech-Republic:Assessment in Follow-up and Shortened Study

Czech-Republic:Higher Education

Czech-Republic:Types of Higher Education Institutions

Czech-Republic:First Cycle Programmes

Czech-Republic:Bachelor

Czech-Republic:Short-Cycle Higher Education

Czech-Republic:Second Cycle Programmes

Czech-Republic:Programmes outside the Bachelor and Master Structure

Czech-Republic:Third Cycle (PhD) Programmes

Czech-Republic:Adult Education and Training

Czech-Republic:Distribution of Responsibilities

Czech-Republic:Developments and Current Policy Priorities

Czech-Republic:Main Providers

Czech-Republic:Main Types of Provision

Czech-Republic:Validation of Non-formal and Informal Learning

Czech-Republic:Teachers and Education Staff

Czech-Republic:Initial Education for Teachers Working in Early Childhood and School Education

Czech-Republic:Conditions of Service for Teachers Working in Early Childhood and School Education

Czech-Republic:Continuing Professional Development for Teachers Working in Early Childhood and School Education

Czech-Republic:Initial Education for Academic Staff in Higher Education

Czech-Republic:Conditions of Service for Academic Staff Working in Higher Education

Czech-Republic:Continuing Professional Development for Academic Staff Working in Higher Education

Czech-Republic:Initial Education for Teachers and Trainers Working in Adult Education and Training

Czech-Republic:Conditions of Service for Teachers and Trainers Working in Adult Education and Training

Czech-Republic:Continuing Professional Development for Teachers and Trainers Working in Adult Education and Training

Czech-Republic:Management and Other Education Staff

Czech-Republic:Management Staff for Early Childhood and School Education

Czech-Republic:Staff Involved in Monitoring Educational Quality for Early Childhood and School Education

Czech-Republic:Education Staff Responsible for Guidance in Early Childhood and School Education

Czech-Republic:Other Education Staff or Staff Working with Schools

Czech-Republic:Management Staff for Higher Education

Czech-Republic:Other Education Staff or Staff Working in Higher Education

Czech-Republic:Management Staff Working in Adult Education and Training

Czech-Republic:Other Education Staff or Staff Working in Adult Education and Training

Czech-Republic:Quality Assurance

Czech-Republic:Quality Assurance in Early Childhood and School Education

Czech-Republic:Quality Assurance in Higher Education

Czech-Republic:Quality Assurance in Adult Education and Training

Czech-Republic:Educational Support and Guidance

Czech-Republic:Special Education Needs Provision within Mainstream Education

Czech-Republic:Separate Special Education Needs Provision in Early Childhood and School Education

Czech-Republic:Support Measures for Learners in Early Childhood and School Education

Czech-Republic:Guidance and Counselling in Early Childhood and School Education

Czech-Republic:Support Measures for Learners in Higher Education

Czech-Republic:Guidance and Counselling in Higher Education

Czech-Republic:Support Measures for Learners in Adult Education and Training

Czech-Republic:Guidance and Counselling in a Lifelong Learning Approach

Czech-Republic:Mobility and Internationalisation

Czech-Republic:Mobility in Early Childhood and School Education

Czech-Republic:Mobility in Higher Education

Czech-Republic:Mobility in Adult Education and Training

Czech-Republic:Other Dimensions of Internationalisation in Early Childhood and School Education

Czech-Republic:Other Dimensions of Internationalisation in Higher Education

Czech-Republic:Other Dimensions of Internationalisation in Adult Education and Training

Czech-Republic:Bilateral Agreements and Worldwide Cooperation

Czech-Republic:Ongoing Reforms and Policy Developments

Czech-Republic:National Reforms in Early Childhood Education and Care

Czech-Republic:National Reforms in School Education

Czech-Republic:National Reforms in Vocational Education and Training and Adult Learning

Czech-Republic:National Reforms in Higher Education

Czech-Republic:National Reforms related to Transversal Skills and Employability

Czech-Republic:European Perspective

Czech-Republic:Legislation

Czech-Republic:Institutions

Czech-Republic:Bibliography

Czech-Republic:Glossary

Types of Institutions

According to the 2004 Education Act, a conservatoire is an independent type of school. Graduates of this school acquire tertiary professional education (vyšší odborné vzdělání) at conservatoire (ISCED 5B) and/or upper secondary education with the school-leaving examination (střední vzdělání s maturitní zkouškou) (ISCED 3A).

Conservatoires provide art education in two types of programmes:

  • six-year programmes focused on music, singing, music and drama for pupils who have completed compulsory schooling; the programmes include upper secondary and tertiary level of education (ISCED 354+554)
  • eight-year programme specialising in dance for pupils who have completed 5th year of the basic school; the programme include lower secondary, upper secondary and tertiary level of education (ISCED 244+354+554)

A pupil receives upper secondary education with the school-leaving examination by successful completion of the relevant part of the educational programme at a conservatoire no sooner than after 4 years in day form of education in the six-year educational programme or after 8 years in day form of education in the eight-year programme.

It is possible to achieve the tertiary professional education in conservatoires by completing the whole educational programme.


Legislation and Bibliography:

Education Act

Government Regulation on the System of Fields of Studies



Geographical Accessibility

The network of conservatoires in the Czech Republic is not very dense (in the school year 2014/15, there were 18 of conservatoires), in some regions there are not any. The highest number of them is in Prague (8). For most conservatories, the region is the founder (12), private or church founders run 5 conservatories. The Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports is the founder only of one conservatoire for pupils with special educational needs which is located in Prague. The average number of pupils per school is 207 (the school size).

For pupils who attend the eight-year educational programme in the field of dance, the school also provides full day care, meals and accommodation. Generally, educational and accommodation facilities – boarding homes for youth (domovy mládeže) and boarding houses for children and pupils with disabilities (internáty) (see the chapter on Organisation and Governance) are established for pupils of upper secondary and tertiary professional schools. The amount of fees in public and state boarding homes for youth and boarding houses for children and pupils with disabilities is limited by a decree.


Legislation and Bibliography:

Decree on School Catering

Decree on School Educational and Boarding Facilities, and School Purpose Facilities

Statistical Yearbook - Education 2014/15. Education Statistic Indicators

Admission Requirements and Choice of School

The school head decides on the admission of applicants for education at a conservatoire.

To the six-year programme of a conservatoire, schools may admit the applicants who have completed compulsory school attendance – ISCED 244 (see chapter on Single Structure Education) or successfully completed basic education (základní vzdělání) prior to finishing their compulsory school attendance.

Schools may admit to the eight-year programme of a conservatoire applicants, who have successfully completed the grade 5 of basic school (základní škola) – ISCED 1.

All applicants must meet all conditions for admission by proving adequate abilities, knowledge, interests and health.

The enrolment proceeding starts with submitting an application and ends with the decision as to the admission/non-admission of an applicant. It always includes an aptitude test. Adult applicants or legal guardians of minor applicants (hereinafter the applicants) submit the application to the head of conservatoire by 30 November. The head of the conservatoire invites applicants to an examination 14 days before its date at the latest (for substitute terms and for other rounds 7 days before the date at the latest). The invitation includes information on requirements for the aptitude test, on the expected number of applicants to be admitted and the criteria of the enrolment proceedings. Aptitude tests are held from 15 to 31 January on dates set by the head of the conservatoire. A school head sends a decision on admission/non-admission to the applicant no later than 10 February. In this way an applicant who has not been admitted may still submit an application for an upper secondary school.

The same rules apply for the appeal in case of non-admission to school as for non-admission to other upper secondary schools.

See also Organisation of Upper Secondary Education, part Admission Requirements.


Legislation and Bibliography:

Education Act

Decree on Organisation of Admission Procedure in Secondary Schools



Age Levels and Grouping of Pupils/Students

Six-year programmes at conservatoires are meant for pupils aged 15–20, and eight-year programmes for pupils aged 11–18. However, almost half of all pupils are older than twenty and more than a third of those admitted to six-year programmes are adults. The first four years of an eight-year programme correspond to lower secondary education – the second stage of basic school (základní škola) (see chapter on Single Structure Education).

Subjects are taught by different teachers. Education is carried out individually or in groups and general subjects can be taught to larger groups. The number of pupils for each subject is set by the curricular documents. Pupils are divided into departments, workplace where general education, specialised theoretical instruction, or special professional training of pupils takes place with the prospect of preparing them for performance of demanding artistic and artistic-educational activities. The competence of a department covers especially development of a certain aspect of an artistic field, preparation and realisation of parts of the school education programmes, educational, artistic, and further creative activities. Departments comprise teachers and pupils of all grades who are specialising in the relevant artistic courses. The minimum number of pupils in a department is 5 and the maximum is 500. The minimum number of students in a school is 80.


Legislation and Bibliography:

Decree on Secondary Education and Education in Conservatoires

Statistical Yearbook - Education 2014/15. Education Statistic Indicators

Organisation of the School Year

The school year at conservatoires starts on September 1 of the current year and finishes on August 31 of the following year. It is divided into teaching periods and holiday periods, the latter set by ministerial decree. The main school holiday is in July and August.

At  conservatoires the school year is divided as described for compulsory education (see chapter Single Structure Education)but if, in accordance with the timetable, work or artistic practice is planned in July and August, second term teaching finishes prior to the general date by the number of teaching days corresponding to the length of the practice. 

The course of the school year in the final grade is influenced by the dates of examinations, see the section on Certification.


Legislation and Bibliography:

Decree on Organisation of School Year

Organisation of the School Day and Week

The organisation of school time is set down by the Education Act, by decrees that fix the school year, holidays and weekly and daily regime, and by educational programmes that fix the number of teaching hours in a week. The weekly and daily timetable depends on the form of education.

In the day form of education, the school week is similar to the working week, i.e. five days from Monday to Friday. The weekly number of lessons is given by the curriculum, up to a maximum of 40 lessons for the conservatoire. The organisation of the evening, distance and other forms of education are described in chapter Adult Education and Training.

One lesson lasts 45 minutes, except for lessons of work practice which last 60 minutes. In justified cases lessons may be split or merged. The educational programme for pupils with special educational needs may specify a different length of school lesson.



Five-day Week System in the Form of Day Attendance

LENGTH OF SCHOOL DAY, EACH DAY OF THE WEEK

Out-of-hours provision (before lessons)
Lessons (starting and finishing times in the morning) Lunch break
Lessons (starting and finishing times in the afternoon)
Out-of-hours provision (after lessons)
Monday
Not set
No earlier than 7 a.m. At least 30 minutes
No later than 8 p.m.
Not set
Tuesday Not set
No earlier than 7 a.m. At least 30 minutes No later than 8 p.m. Not set
Wednesday Not set
No earlier than 7 a.m. At least 30 minutes No later than 8 p.m.
Not set
Thursday Not set
No earlier than 7 a.m. At least 30 minutes No later than 8 p.m. Not set
Friday Not set
No earlier than 7 a.m. At least 30 minutes No later than 8 p.m. Not set


The daily timetable is derived from the total number of lessons at the particular educational level and from regulations dealing with the beginning and the end of the education. The minimum number of lessons per week in a grade is set by the curricular documents; for the maximum number of lessons per week see above.

The beginning and end of theoretical classes in day education is decided by the school head – classes usually start at 8 a.m., at 7 a.m. at the earliest, and finish at the latest by 8 p.m. The maximum number of compulsory lessons in one day, including a lunch break, is 8, exceptionally 9, with a maximum of 7 lessons without a lunch break. There is a 15-20-minute break usually after the first two lessons and a break, usually of 10 minutes, between other lessons.

Art practice is carried out in the form of compact blocs, usually in whole weeks.

Conservatoires can provide pupils with opportunities for extra-curricular activities for their leisure time, focusing primarily on active relaxation, development of their skills and interests, preparation for lessons, and participation in contests and shows. In out of school hours, pupils can also use guidance services (see chapter on Educational Support and Guidance), services of leisure time centres (střediska volného času), school libraries etc. For more information about these services and facilities see chapters on Organisation, and Governance and Funding in Education.


Legislation and Bibliography:

Education Act

Decree on Secondary Education and Education in Conservatoires

Framework educational programmes for vocational upper secondary education