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Czech-Republic:Adult Education and Training Funding

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Overview Czech Republic

Contents

Czech-Republic:Political, Social and Economic Background and Trends

Czech-Republic:Historical Development

Czech-Republic:Main Executive and Legislative Bodies

Czech-Republic:Population: Demographic Situation, Languages and Religions

Czech-Republic:Political and Economic Situation

Czech-Republic:Organisation and Governance

Czech-Republic:Fundamental Principles and National Policies

Czech-Republic:Lifelong Learning Strategy

Czech-Republic:Organisation of the Education System and of its Structure

Czech-Republic:Organisation of Private Education

Czech-Republic:National Qualifications Framework

Czech-Republic:Administration and Governance at Central and/or Regional Level

Czech-Republic:Administration and Governance at Local and/or Institutional Level

Czech-Republic:Statistics on Organisation and Governance

Czech-Republic:Funding in Education

Czech-Republic:Early Childhood and School Education Funding

Czech-Republic:Higher Education Funding

Czech-Republic:Adult Education and Training Funding

Czech-Republic:Early Childhood Education and Care

Czech-Republic:Organisation of Programmes for Children under 2-3 years

Czech-Republic:Teaching and Learning in Programmes for Children under 2-3 years

Czech-Republic:Assessment in Programmes for Children under 2-3 years

Czech-Republic:Organisation of Programmes for Children over 2-3 years

Czech-Republic:Teaching and Learning in Programmes for Children over 2-3 years

Czech-Republic:Assessment in Programmes for Children over 2-3 years

Czech-Republic:Organisational Variations and Alternative Structures in Early Childhood Education and Care

Czech-Republic:Single Structure Education (Integrated Primary and Lower Secondary Education)

Czech-Republic:Organisation of Single Structure Education

Czech-Republic:Teaching and Learning in Single Structure Education

Czech-Republic:Assessment in Single Structure Education

Czech-Republic:Organisational Variations and Alternative Structures in Single Structure Education

Czech-Republic:Upper Secondary and Post-Secondary Non-Tertiary Education

Czech-Republic:Organisation of Upper Secondary Education

Czech-Republic:Teaching and Learning in Upper Secondary Education

Czech-Republic:Assessment in Upper Secondary Education

Czech-Republic:Organisation of Conservatoires (Arts Education)

Czech-Republic:Teaching and Learning in Conservatoires (Arts Education)

Czech-Republic:Assessment in Conservatoires (Arts Education)

Czech-Republic:Organisation of Follow-up and Shortened Study

Czech-Republic:Teaching and Learning in Follow-up and Shortened Study

Czech-Republic:Assessment in Follow-up and Shortened Study

Czech-Republic:Higher Education

Czech-Republic:Types of Higher Education Institutions

Czech-Republic:First Cycle Programmes

Czech-Republic:Bachelor

Czech-Republic:Short-Cycle Higher Education

Czech-Republic:Second Cycle Programmes

Czech-Republic:Programmes outside the Bachelor and Master Structure

Czech-Republic:Third Cycle (PhD) Programmes

Czech-Republic:Adult Education and Training

Czech-Republic:Distribution of Responsibilities

Czech-Republic:Developments and Current Policy Priorities

Czech-Republic:Main Providers

Czech-Republic:Main Types of Provision

Czech-Republic:Validation of Non-formal and Informal Learning

Czech-Republic:Teachers and Education Staff

Czech-Republic:Initial Education for Teachers Working in Early Childhood and School Education

Czech-Republic:Conditions of Service for Teachers Working in Early Childhood and School Education

Czech-Republic:Continuing Professional Development for Teachers Working in Early Childhood and School Education

Czech-Republic:Initial Education for Academic Staff in Higher Education

Czech-Republic:Conditions of Service for Academic Staff Working in Higher Education

Czech-Republic:Continuing Professional Development for Academic Staff Working in Higher Education

Czech-Republic:Initial Education for Teachers and Trainers Working in Adult Education and Training

Czech-Republic:Conditions of Service for Teachers and Trainers Working in Adult Education and Training

Czech-Republic:Continuing Professional Development for Teachers and Trainers Working in Adult Education and Training

Czech-Republic:Management and Other Education Staff

Czech-Republic:Management Staff for Early Childhood and School Education

Czech-Republic:Staff Involved in Monitoring Educational Quality for Early Childhood and School Education

Czech-Republic:Education Staff Responsible for Guidance in Early Childhood and School Education

Czech-Republic:Other Education Staff or Staff Working with Schools

Czech-Republic:Management Staff for Higher Education

Czech-Republic:Other Education Staff or Staff Working in Higher Education

Czech-Republic:Management Staff Working in Adult Education and Training

Czech-Republic:Other Education Staff or Staff Working in Adult Education and Training

Czech-Republic:Quality Assurance

Czech-Republic:Quality Assurance in Early Childhood and School Education

Czech-Republic:Quality Assurance in Higher Education

Czech-Republic:Quality Assurance in Adult Education and Training

Czech-Republic:Educational Support and Guidance

Czech-Republic:Special Education Needs Provision within Mainstream Education

Czech-Republic:Separate Special Education Needs Provision in Early Childhood and School Education

Czech-Republic:Support Measures for Learners in Early Childhood and School Education

Czech-Republic:Guidance and Counselling in Early Childhood and School Education

Czech-Republic:Support Measures for Learners in Higher Education

Czech-Republic:Guidance and Counselling in Higher Education

Czech-Republic:Support Measures for Learners in Adult Education and Training

Czech-Republic:Guidance and Counselling in a Lifelong Learning Approach

Czech-Republic:Mobility and Internationalisation

Czech-Republic:Mobility in Early Childhood and School Education

Czech-Republic:Mobility in Higher Education

Czech-Republic:Mobility in Adult Education and Training

Czech-Republic:Other Dimensions of Internationalisation in Early Childhood and School Education

Czech-Republic:Other Dimensions of Internationalisation in Higher Education

Czech-Republic:Other Dimensions of Internationalisation in Adult Education and Training

Czech-Republic:Bilateral Agreements and Worldwide Cooperation

Czech-Republic:Ongoing Reforms and Policy Developments

Czech-Republic:National Reforms in Early Childhood Education and Care

Czech-Republic:National Reforms in School Education

Czech-Republic:National Reforms in Vocational Education and Training and Adult Learning

Czech-Republic:National Reforms in Higher Education

Czech-Republic:National Reforms related to Transversal Skills and Employability

Czech-Republic:European Perspective

Czech-Republic:Legislation

Czech-Republic:Institutions

Czech-Republic:Bibliography

Czech-Republic:Glossary

Funding

Further education is funded from the state budget if it is offered at schools and leads to a recognised educational qualification.

Adult education courses leading to a defined educational qualification are  financed by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports as follows: in combined and distance study at the higher education institutions (vysoké školy) on the same basis as for on-site studies, at the upper secondary schools (střední školy), based on a certain percentage of the average cost per pupil in a daily form of study for the particular study field, depending on the form of education (5 per cent in distance study, in combined form by assembling costs per pupil for day and distance forms of study). The only exceptions are courses in which adults can complete their basic education (základní vzdělání), which are fully funded.

Lifelong learning at higher education institutions, which does not provide a recognised level of qualifications, is regulated by the section on Lifelong Learning in the Act on Higher Education. Lifelong learning courses (profession-oriented courses and special interest courses) are either paid or are free-of-charge. Public higher education institution can also use public contributions for funding lifelong learning programmes. This legislative option is used in the case of the education of seniors: part of the contribution to be granted at the request of a public higher education institution for the  university of the third age is for covering the costs associated with the implementation of lifelong learning programmes aimed at seniors' education through the university of the third age, as well as for the costs associated with the preparation and development of new programmes (including the cost of their material and technical support or ensuring teaching aids). The amount of the contribution depends on the size of the study group and type of education, i.e. whether it is in the form of virtual teaching or lecturing, and if classrooms equipped with IT equipment or laboratories are needed.

Otherwise, further education is funded by departments or companies or must be paid for by the student.

The funding of educational activities at the institutional level is up to the employer. Total company expenditure on training is assessed by a sample survey.

Retraining is financed from various sources. Unemployed people registered as seeking work are entitled to attend retraining sessions fully financed by Labour Offices, which can also cover expenses for transport, accommodation and meals from the state budget contributions. The sum spent on retraining steadily increases in line with the National Action Employment Scheme. Other participants can bear the cost for retraining themselves. If an institution organises retraining sessions for its employees, the costs are covered by the employer, and if there is an agreement with the Labour Office, the Office can share the costs.

Some financial resources for further education are provided from abroad, mostly from the European Social Fund.


Fees Paid by Learners

For adults who study under the Education Act, a course of study which leads to a specific qualification (including the follow-up courses – nástavbové studium, shorten courses – zkrácené studium, and courses for gaining the basic education – základní vzdělání) is free of charge at public schools (except for tertiary professional school – vyšší odborné školy), although tuition fees are paid at private schools.

Tuition fees are paid at language schools (including public ones) even in the case of one-year full-time foreign language courses.

There are also various further education courses which do not lead to a defined level of education offered by schools as supplementary paid services, to earn income.

For fees in study programmes at higher education institutions see section Fees within Public Higher Education.

The courses within the life-long learning can be provided either for free or fee-based.

Unemployed people registered as job seekers are entitled to attend retraining sessions fully financed by labour offices. Other participants can bear the cost for retraining themselves. If an institution organises retraining sessions for its employees, the costs are covered by the employer; under certain conditions and with written agreement with the labour office, the office can share the costs.

Examinations (leading to professional qualification) organised under the Act on Verification and Recognition of Further Education Results are paid for by an amount equal to the sum of the lump compensation necessary for material, space, technical, information personal and administrative expenses of the authorised person, if need be of the examination board members, and an appropriate bonus for the authorised person (examination board members).

The cost of further vocational training of employees under the Labour Code is generally paid by employers. They often even co-finance education which goes beyond their requirements.

Other types of further education – either vocational training or personal development education are fully financed by the participants and the prices are set by the free market. Nevertheless, employers contribute financially to some courses (vocational, ICT or language ones) if it is in their own interest.


Financial Support for Adult Learners

People studying on one-year full-time language courses are considered as students (i.e. they have an official student status)  in the case they successfully passed the first school-leaving examination (maturitní zkouška) or graduated from a conservatoire (absolutorium) in the calendar year in which they start the one-year language course. These participants are entitled to tax benefits, student discounts, e.g. for public transportation, etc. (For more details on financial support of students see Financial Support for Learners in tertiary education.)

Participants of lifelong learning courses at higher education institutions (vysoké školy) do not have an official student status and, thus, are not entitled to student benefits.

Unemployed people registered as seeking work are entitled to attend retraining fully financed by labour offices, which can also cover expenses for transport, accommodation and meals, or personal accident insurance during retraining from state funding for active employment policy. Participants in retraining are entitled to support at the rate of 60 per cent rate of their average monthly net pay in their last employment, to a maximum of 0.65 of average wage. If the participant has not yet worked or cannot justify his or her income, the support is set at 0-14 times of the average wage. If an employer requires the retraining, they may provide employees with a set amount of leave and monetary compensation.

The costs related to education provided by an employer within the professional development of an employee under the Labour Code are described in more details in the chapter 8 on Adult Education and Training.

An independent entrepreneur can include the costs of the examination organised under the Act on Verification and Recognition of Further Education Results into expenses. A tax payer with an income from an employment can deduce it from the tax base; however the maximum amount in both cases must not exceed CZK 10 000 (EUR 370; EUR/CZK 27.021 – 28 January 2016).


Private and Grant-Aided Education

After 1990, there was a rapid growth in the number of private training institutions. Educational services provided on a profit basis are not controlled by any governing body. The only exceptions are institutions that offer retraining (which apply to the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports for accreditation), those providing recognised further vocational training in specific professions (which request accreditation from an authorising body of the relevant sector) and institutions providing language education (which require accreditation from the Ministry of Education). This group of private educational institutions works without state contributions. They provide their services to both individuals and firms, or to the public administration and its bodies, e.g. labour offices.

Another group of private educational institutions consists of private schools providing education according to the Education Act (basic schools – základní školy, upper secondary schools – střední školy, tertiary professional schools – vyšší odborné školy, or basic art schools – základní umělecké školy). They can receive certain state contributions but only for initial education and further education leading to a defined level of education, not for courses of further education.

Further education courses at private schools are paid by participants themselves or the courses are paid for them, partly or fully, by their employer.

Legislation and Bibliography:

Decree of the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports and Ministry of Social Affairs on Further Study, possibly teaching which for obtaining state social benefit and pension insurance are considered to be studies at secondary schools and higher education institutions