FARNET
Fisheries Areas Network

Country Factsheet

United Kingdom - 19 FLAGs - 18.1 M€

The UK’s fisheries areas currently face a wide variety of challenges which reflects the diversity of the industry. Objectives of CLLD in the UK include stimulating coastal economies to deliver growth and addressing the decline of traditional fishing industries; retaining skills whilst at the same time addressing an aging fishing workforce and lack of new entrants to the industry. Deprivation, remoteness and lack of local community capacity pose challenges in outlying areas. These are the focus of the 19 UK FLAGs’ strategies. There is one national programme for fisheries CLLD, however given the devolved nature of governance within the UK, the implementation of CLLD is managed by the four devolved administrations. 

CLLD Programme

CLLD Context: 

There is one national programme for fisheries CLLD in the UK, however given the devolved nature of governance within the UK, the implementation of CLLD is implemented according to local specificities by the four devolved administrations. There is a national managing authority which is ultimately responsible for the programme and plays a coordinating and reporting function.

Employment in the fisheries sector accounted for 12 022 jobs in 2013 (7 333 FTE) with employment in the aquaculture accounted for 18 640 jobs in 2013 (10 581 FTE). This gives a total of 30 662 jobs and 17 914 FTEs in the fisheries and aquaculture sector. Total employment in the fisheries and aquaculture sector made up about 0.102% of total national employment in 2013. Overall the size of the fishing fleet in the UK has reduced in size between 2008 and 2013.

A two page summary of the Operational Programme including contact details of the Managing Authority is available at the following link.

An overview of the UK’s EMFF programme is available at the following link.

 

Axis 4 achievements (2007-2013): 

In the previous programming period, UK had a total of 22 FLAGs, all of which were Coastal. Scotland had 11 FLAGs covering almost its whole coast line and the Shetland Isles. Wales had 4 FLAGs which again covered a large part of their coastline and included Anglesey. England had 6 FLAGs which were located in Cornwall & Isles of Scilly, Northern Devon, Hastings, North Norfolk, North & West Cumbria and Holderness. Northern Ireland concentrated its FLAG activity in 1 area on the south-east coast. Axis 4 projects varied in scale and nature reflecting the diversity of fishing areas and budgetary allocation. They contributed to tourism and heritage in fisheries communities as well as more fisheries specific projects including training and apprenticeship schemes. Projects contributed to supply chain development as well as more sectoral and territorial aspects such as sea food festivals.

CLLD objectives and challenges for 2014-2020: 

Community-led local development will have to address a variety of challenges in the coming years which reflects the diversity of the industry across the UK. The main challenges faced are implementing CFP reform, particularly a focus in England; stimulating costal economies to deliver growth and addressing the decline of traditional fishing industries. A key challenge is to retain skills whilst at the same time addressing an aging fishing workforce and lack of young / new entrants to the industry. Deprivation, remoteness and lack of local community capacity pose challenges in outlying areas.

To cope with these challenges, the objectives for CLLD in the UK 2014-2020 in England will be to support fishing communities to adapt to the reformed Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) and supporting sustainable economic growth. Other parts of the UK will focus on adding value to fisheries products, diversification inside and outside commercial fishing and promoting innovation at all stages of the supply chain. Attracting young people to the industry and promoting social wellbeing, environment and culture are also included as objectives.

The number of FLAGs overall changed from 22 to 19 in the UK. Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales retained similar geographic coverage as the EFF, England chose three new areas for FLAGs.

Compared to 2007-2013, the total budget for CLLD in the UK has been reduced from €24.7M in EFF to €18.1M in EMFF, so the average budget per FLAG is lower (from €1.123M to €0.953M).

Although the overall CLLD budget in the UK EMFF has reduced, the budget for CLLD in Scotland has increased and the Scottish Government are providing central co-finance, which was not the case in EFF. The budget for CLLD in the other devolved administration areas has been reduced in EMFF.

Multi-fund CLLD in the UK

The multi-fund approach is being delivered in Scotland through the eight Scottish FLAGs which have developed joint Local Development Strategies with the LEADER LAGs in their areas. The EAFRD is being used as the main fund, and therefore the administration and animation costs of the FLAG are being paid for with EAFRD monies, this makes the best use of the EMFF money which can be used to support fisheries projects.

There are no formal links between the EMFF and other ESIF in the rest of the UK, although FLAGs, particularly in England, are encouraged to work in partnership with the other ESIF to secure funding for projects that are not core fisheries projects.

CLLD Budget

  • EMFF budget for CLLD: 
    €13 583 840
  • Co-funding: 
    €4 527 947
  • Proportion of CLLD in EMFF budget: 
    6%
Number of FLAGs: 
19

National Network

There is no National Network unit however there is networking is taking place at UK level with the intention for all the 19 FLAGs to meet twice a year together with the MA and IBs, rotating the venue between the four devolved regions. Communication is being encouraged at UK level and it is hoped to use myFARNET as the platform for this. Networking and training is also taking place within the four devolved regions.

The FLAGs and their areas

FLAGs in Scotland still cover the whole coastline, and are all LAG/FLAGs. This means in practice that a number of FLAGs are incorporated in multiple LEADER LDSs and are in some cases covering larger areas than under EFF.

Each of the four Implementing Bodies are responsible for selecting FLAGs: in England it is the Marine Management Organisation, in Northern Ireland it is Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs, in Wales it is the Welsh Government and it in Scotland it is Marine Scotland.

The call for FLAGs started in Scotland in 2013, in Wales and England in 2016 and 2017 in Northern Ireland.  Scottish FLAGs were approved in 2015, English ones in 2016 and Welsh ones in 2017.

Cooperation

For information on cooperation click here.

FLAGs

Code Name Region Surface area (km²) Population Population density (per km²) Employment in fisheries*
UK201 Forth FLAG
East Lothian Fife
201 40000 199 380
UK202 North East Scotland FLAG
Scotland
7250 102911 51 7700
UK203 Highland & Moray FLAG
Highlands & Islands
15316 138392 9 1620
UK204 Orkney Islands FLAG
Scotland
974 21350 22 587
UK205 Shetland Islands FLAG 1468 23167 15 914
UK206 Outer Hebrides FLAG
Scotland
3070 27684 9 762
UK208 Dumfries & Galloway FLAG
Scotland
6436 150830 23 857
UK209 North of Tyne FLAG
Northumberland and North Tyneside
751 72728 97 156
UK210 Holderness FLAG
Yorkshire
249 60199 242 195
UK211 North Thames FLAG
England
98185 32834 0 45
UK212 Hastings FLAG
England
30 90300 3038 98
UK213 Dorset and East Devon FLAG
England
560 103000 184 127
UK214 Cornwall and Isles of Scilly FLAG
England
3563 532300 149 800
(*)according to the information received from the FLAG

Map

Publication date: 
25/10/2017
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