By clicking any link on this page you are accepting the website's Terms and conditions. OK, I agree

EDUCATION, YOUTH, SPORT AND CULTURE

Trócaire Sierra Leone
Certified organisation

Hosting organisation
  • About
  • Projects

Trócaire was set up in 1973 as a charity to express the concern of the Irish Catholic Church for the suffering of people living in the world’s poorest regions. Trócaire envisages a just and peaceful world where people’s dignity is ensured and rights are respected; where basic needs are met and resources are shared equitably; where people have control over their own lives and those in power act for the common good. Trócaire works with local and church partners to support communities in over 20 developing countries across Africa, Asia, Latin America & the Middle East with a focus on food and resource rights, women's empowerment and humanitarian response.

Trócaire has supported programmes in Sierra Leone since the 1980s, initially focusing on women’s empowerment. In 2003, Trócaire Sierra Leone also started working to improve governance and political participation, and since 2013 also on livelihoods and resilience. The country office was set up in 2007 to provide more support after the country’s civil war. Trócaire Sierra Leone currently works in partnership with local church and civil society organisations in four geographical areas including Port Loko, Kambia, Bombali and the Western Rural Area. In 2015/2016, Trócaire Sierra Leone also responded to the Ebola crisis, providing aid to those in quarantine areas and information campaigns on how to stop the spread of the virus.

Past projects (1)
Deployment
Victoria sells ripe, red tomatoes at bustling Kirambi market, south Rwanda. More than 60 percent of chronically hungry people are women. Trócaire helps young people like Victoria begin small businesses so their future families won’t be hungry.
Victoria sells ripe, red tomatoes at bustling Kirambi market, south Rwanda. More than 60 percent of chronically hungry people are women. Trócaire helps young people like Victoria begin small businesses so their future families won’t be hungry.