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European network to reduce vulnerabilities in health [Vulnerability NW] [709966] - Operating Grant
Network building activities by lead MdM

Start month:1 - End month: 12

2016 will see the consolidation of the network’s activities. Dialogue between the members will continue, sharing knowledge about each other’s specific objectives, activities and expertise. Ensurin...
2016 will see the consolidation of the network’s activities. Dialogue between the members will continue, sharing knowledge about each other’s specific objectives, activities and expertise. Ensuring exchange between the main workshops and events foreseen in 2016 will happen through regular teleconferences for which minutes will be made available on our website’s member’s space (deliverable 7). Priorities for 2016 in terms of mutual learning include:
• Supporting 5 new members willing to start collecting quantitative data from 2016 onwards: MRCI in Ireland, Carusel in Romania, Slovene Philanthropy and the Health Centre for Undocumented Migrants in Norway. The 5th member, MdM Luxembourg, already started collection in 2015 but needs ongoing support.
• Enlarging the Network to organisations & academics. The network will grow from 19 to 24 members, where possible, in countries not yet covered. The Network is open and inclusive but also a brand new structure with limited financial resources. The approach to membership has been revised and in 2016 we will invite researchers/academics to formally join the Network just like the other organisational members. Enlarging the network to include researchers will offer the network members additional insights about their own countries as well as information about new countries. Therefore, a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with maximum five new members integrating the European Network will be drafted and signed, making formal their commitments to make this mutual learning and common advocacy happen (deliverable 2). As in 2015, five individual need assessments will be made available (deliverable 9). It will be constructed on individual responses to a questionnaire, and based on four pillars: quality of service delivery, data collection, advocacy and empowerment. Each learning needs report will summarize what new member organizations need and expect to get out of the Network for each Member association. This tool serves at measuring the added value of our Network over the three years of our program.
• Organising four workshops:
- Advocacy skill building;
- Improving the quality of health service provision workshop;
- Quantitative data collection workshop;
- Collecting and using testimonies workshop
• Organising three peer reviews: the members will understand how other members work in the field and produce a written report drafted by both sides on key lessons learned to improve quality and efficiency of service provision.
Advocacy is an essential element in the work of the members of the Network, because it is how they achieve social change. Therefore, we have built into the cyclical rhythm of the three-year work programme an advocacy skill building training at each annual network meeting. In 2016, this will be once again about sharing “Tops and Flops”: we support each participant to develop a learning culture where successes and failures are not used to judge or evaluate members but as opportunities for improvement. In addition, the advocacy training will aim at improving the skills of the members to deal with high level stakeholders. Therefore, the advocacy skill building will include mutual learning with an experienced trainer.
Moreover, an MEP round table planned for the Autumn 2016 (to present the 2016 annual network publication) will be a direct and unique occasion for each Network member to apply their learning on advocacy through bilateral meetings with MEPs that will be arranged in connection with the event.

Mutual learning and sharing expertise by lead MdM

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A workshop on improving the quality of health service provision will be organised at the annual network meeting in February 2016. As in 2015, the Secretariat will assess members’ expectations and pr...
A workshop on improving the quality of health service provision will be organised at the annual network meeting in February 2016. As in 2015, the Secretariat will assess members’ expectations and priorities before the workshop – through a short online survey – in order to organise a learning session that best responds to their needs (deliverable 10). Topics to be covered might include how to work with interpreters or peer workers, how to improve the referral to mainstream healthcare providers, a follow-up session to 2015's workshop on how to address violence, etc. However, in view of the current refugee reception crisis, it will most definitely include how teams can respond to surges in demand, and how to adequately deal with refugees’ specific psychosocial needs (e.g. post-traumatic stress disorder). Quality of health services (or the lack of it) must be at the center of every discussion on reducing vulnerabilities in health. This workshop will be the occasion to identify questions/recommendations linked to quality when organising the following peer reviews (deliverable 19). Two satisfaction surveys for the advocacy (SO1) and quality service provision workshop will help the Network secretariat measuring the satisfaction of the members, the importance of fulfilling and exceeding their expectations and identifying challenges that can be tackled for future meetings or workshops (deliverable 16).
In 2016 and 2017, the Network will carry out peer reviews on quality of service delivery and about patient empowerment. In order to prepare these reviews, part of the workshop on improving service provision will be devoted to preparation of these peer visits. Because of the divergent needs of populations facing vulnerabilities, the focus of this session will not be a prescriptive list of things to do in service provision. Rather, it will identify a series of questions that are linked to quality criteria and that service providers should ask themselves when managing services ((deliverable 19). These questions will be used by network members to evaluate the quality of each other’s services during the peer reviews. Once this series of questions is validated by the peer reviews in 2016-17, it will be published and widely disseminated in 2017 to other health stakeholders who could use them as a quality checklist.
During the peer reviews, organisations with similar target groups or facing similar challenges will paired up for intensive and detailed exchange on their operational approaches. The specific groupings for 2016 will be established at the annual network meeting but might include:
• MdM France & Greece with the organisation Carusel in Romania to exchange on services for Roma communities,
• Bulgarian Family Planning and Sexual Health Association (BFPA) with MdM UK & Spain for their expertise in sexual health activities,
• MdM Greece and UK with Menedék in Hungary to explore how they fight xenophobia,
• Slovene Philanthropy in Slovenia, Health Centre for Undocumented Migrants in Norway with MdM Germany and MdM Belgium on mental healthcare.
During each visit, the peer groups will jointly write a report on the main conclusions and lessons. The reports will be put on the network website (deliverable 20) The MEP event in Brussels will also serve as a good opportunity to share with all the members the outcome of the peer reviews by organizing a small session after the main event. This peer review debriefing session will be part of the MEP event report (deliverable 334).
For all the main exchanges between Network members (the annual network meeting, the advocacy and quality of service provision workshop, the peer reviews, the qualitative and quantitative workshop and the MEP event), preparatory documents (including agenda, content of the workshop, list of participants,) and minutes will be systematically drafted and shared with members for each event (deliverables 1, 11, 12, 13, 14, 17, 21, 34).
A concrete way of ensuring
Data collection activities by lead MdM

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In 2016 the network will continue to work on the process of data collection, how data is analysed and how data can serve advocacy. Raw data from routine data collection will be available on key indica...
In 2016 the network will continue to work on the process of data collection, how data is analysed and how data can serve advocacy. Raw data from routine data collection will be available on key indicators; other raw data will be available upon request. After receiving technical support from the Secretariat in 2015, five members will collect data for the first time: MdM Luxembourg, Migrant Rights Centre Ireland (MRCI), Slovene Philanthropy, Health Centre for Undocumented Migrants in Norway and Carusel in Romania. Therefore a total of 14 Network members will collect data for the 2017 European Observatory Report in the course of 2016. As data collection is not easy to implement, our goal is that of the 14 Network members trained for data collection, at least 11 will meet the quality/quantity objectives in 2016. Members that will start collecting data in 2017 will also be invited to attend the 2016 quantitative data collection workshop. Minutes of the workshop and post workshop survey will feed into preparation of future trainings and workshops in 2017.
As for 2015, the European Network will produce a user-friendly 48 page European Observatory report in 3 languages (English, French and Spanish). A second, complete version with full analysis including infectious diseases will be drafted in English.
For 2016, in order to be realistic with the increased difficulties faced as we will be studying countries for which the Network has no prior knowledge at all, we will cover six countries for the legal analysis. The other reason is also that we covered in 2015 ten countries instead of eight as foreseen in the FPA for 2015. The legal reviews about access to healthcare (in theory and practice) will follow the same terms of reference used for the 2015 legal analysis reports.
As communication is critical to the success of advocacy, the Secretariat will explore the existing skills in communication within the Network by inviting members to prepare materials such as patient testimonies or articles and photos for annual Observatory Report, the newsletters and website. Statistics without real life examples do not effectively communicate the reality of patients. Figures need to be accompanied by testimonies which provide context that helps the reader to understand/imagine the situation. Otherwise readers might not understand the health impact of what it means to live on 300 Euro/month or to cross the Niger desert.
The use of qualitative methods such as testimonies requires guidance to ensure respect and protection of the patient. Experience with network members shows that interactive sessions are more efficient than academic lectures at instilling new skills and practices. Therefore we will organise a qualitative data collection workshop in 2016, led by an appropriate expert on collecting case studies and testimonies. This session will include role playing exercises in order to practice interview techniques. A video about these exercises will be produced and disseminated online after the workshop. Guidelines for collecting testimonies (purpose and methodology for interviews) will be updated and disseminated to our members collecting data throughout 2016.

Dissemination and civil dialogue activities by lead MdM

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The European Advocacy Coordinator (EAC) will continue the focus on ensuring representation of the Network towards European institutions and stakeholders. Our philosophy is – as much as possible - to...
The European Advocacy Coordinator (EAC) will continue the focus on ensuring representation of the Network towards European institutions and stakeholders. Our philosophy is – as much as possible - to assist members of small, front-line organisations and volunteers with concrete field experience to represent the Network. The foundation for this activity is the Network’s quantitative and qualitative data collection, e.g. systematic dissemination of the annual report, highlighting relevant aspects of the data at conferences or meetings on specific themes.
As an increasing number of network members collect data and contribute to a stronger evidence base for policy actions, the Network will ensure European stakeholders get to hear about this bottom-up perspective through the wide range of civil dialogue processes available. These include towards:
Commission and decentralised agencies: meetings with relevant DGs and agencies (ECDC, FRA, EASO, etc.);
• Participation in relevant EC consultations and preparing ‘alert’ letters to DG SANTE, but also to ECDC and / or FRA about specific situations that pose a threat to public health and/or that are flagrant violations of the human right for health, and in which urgent mediation by EU institutions is needed,
European Parliament: meetings with MEPs and political group secretariats. Participation of Network representatives in relevant EP events;
• Organising an MEP round table in Brussels (open to the press) in Autumn 2016 to launch the European Observatory report featuring presentations by Network members (and kick-off of the report dissemination strategy). This will be accompanied by bilateral meetings between Network members and their national MEPs.
The EAC will continue monitoring and updating members about the MdM & vulnerabilities network European advocacy activities through the bi monthly progress reports called EU newsflash (deliverable 36). Given the growing refugee crisis, the EAC task of monitoring EU policy developments, reports from other relevant actors (NGOs, European institutions, academic material etc.) will have a special focus on migration. The Network will raise awareness about health vulnerabilities related to the lack of safe and legal migration channels, migrants’ lack of effective access to healthcare and the need to protect seriously ill migrants from expulsion.